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Thread: BRS - Yes, I'm doing it

  1. #11
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    Default Re: BRS - Yes, I'm doing it

    If CC offers a BRS in a certified aircraft, then CC's has met or exceeded the testing and operational requirements of the FAA for a BRS system. To certify anything is an expensive and time consuming effort. I'm sure CC's is mindful of that fact.

    Obviously CC is not going to publish the data and/or certification package. This might let to a competitive disadvantage as it is most likely proprietary information.

    If CC offers it an an option, then rest assured (provided proper install and maintenance) that the system is capable.
    Last edited by aeroaddict; 12-30-2020 at 02:02 PM.
    Dan Arnold
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  2. #12
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    Default Re: BRS - Yes, I'm doing it

    Thanks for the reply. I realize there are liability reasons to not get the info too, this is a tough situation. I just don't know how strong the "cage" is or whatever it's called and the welds. It's probably moot, if you need to pull the handle for the chute you're in a bad situation as it is. If the chute works, great, if not, then probably not a good ending was in order.

    I think what they'd have to do to prove this is some type of drop test or even a "drone" cub where they can deploy the chute over a range and verify the results.

    I'm still on order for BRS and planning to go with it. I just have some concerns and when at build week in Feb I want to learn more about this to trust my life with it at this price point. Certainly a lot of money to be putting into this feature, great to have it, but I'd just like to have confidence in it.

  3. #13
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    Default Re: BRS - Yes, I'm doing it

    Just some food for thought.

    In all engineering determinations, the final production configuration will always have a safety factor (some number X's the ultimate or failure load). When (projecting here) CC got certification for the BRS they most likely had to gain approval of their engineering models that are now locked down at a certain revision level along with physical testing to demonstrate all required certification parameters.

    I have no doubt that the fuselage is strong enough, especially if you watch a bunch of landings. There can be a lot of (shock loads) abuse.

    I have no skin in the BRS debate. I do not have a BRS and never really considered it. For me, to much weight and I don't think it would work well for my flying. Example; last fall the CFO and I went up to a popular mountain town. I was at 10,000 but only 500 ft above the ground in most places. Maybe transitioning across a valley I might have enough altitude for a successful BRS deployment, but the winds can be nasty in the mountains and the possibility of a BRS non soft landing is real.

    Which scenario is worse? BRS mountain landing or non BRS mountain landing. I can't answer that and hope I never can answer that.
    Dan Arnold
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  4. #14
    Senior Member turbopilot's Avatar
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    Default Re: BRS - Yes, I'm doing it

    Quote Originally Posted by aeroaddict View Post

    Which scenario is worse? BRS mountain landing or non BRS mountain landing. I can't answer that and hope I never can answer that.
    Given the operating envelope of a cub, opening shock should not be an issue. The exception might be deployment in a dive from a high altitude high altitude (above 12,000). Opening shock is proportional to TAS, not IAS.

    The BRS parachute for the cub does not have reefing line cutters like the CAPS system in the Cirrus airplanes. So there really is little more to test. They have tested static parachute deployment on the ground. It works. Since there is no reefing in the BRS cub parachute system, the parachute should work to very low altitudes depending on the Gz vector of the airplane at deployment.

    I have the BRS system in my new SS. I plan to use the system anytime it would appear landing under the chute vertically at 17 mph appears to be a better option than landing horizontally at some speed higher than stall speed. There may be some situations where you may want to consider deploying the chute when landing horizontally. Like an engine out landing where you misjudge the the landing distance with obstacles ahead.
    Bob Anderson, CC11-00435, N94RA

  5. #15
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    Default Re: BRS - Yes, I'm doing it

    There is no doubt that BRS adds another layer of protection, and the option to use it.

    I just think that I would like more control on where to try to set the plane down as opposed to not having a choice. Maybe one could glide to a better place and then pop the chute?

    Happy New Year!

    IMG_0408.jpg
    Last edited by aeroaddict; 01-01-2021 at 04:30 PM.
    Dan Arnold
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  6. #16
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    Default Re: BRS - Yes, I'm doing it

    You might have already seen this, but a good discussion on Mike Patey's BRS video and a structural failure of a super cub.

    The thread is more about the failure but a lot of good discussions on the use of BRS systems.

    Super Cub Structural Failure
    Dan Arnold
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  7. #17
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    Default Re: BRS - Yes, I'm doing it

    I don't know if I already wrote this but my reasoning for doing this is:

    -I nearly had a mid-air in A-10's because my wingman blew through the floor separating us
    -I hear of far too many mid-airs, my first squadron had one and there are far too many
    -My best friend, a lear driver, flying recreational, had a mid-air, I think he survived the mid-air and ground impact is what killed him
    -People are far more heads down now with glass cockpits. A friend took me flying 3-4 years ago, he was so involved in the G1000 I was looking out doing the clearing
    -There is always the possibility of structural failure
    -Drones are a problem now and are on the rise. I was a passenger in a 757 when we had a near miss with a large drone (movie shooting type). A drone could take out a wing, tail, etc.
    -Bird through the canopy incapacitating you, if losing consciousness...

    It can easily be removed and it's a great last ditch option. I've been flying ejection seat aircraft my entire adult life and having that last option is comforting to know you have available. There was recently an incident, I don't know the details, a fellow A-10 pilot was killed I think in an extra 300? There was a youtube video about it recently among other recent incidents. You have to think when we hear of mishaps "if they had a chute" how could things have changed?

    Some say stall speed is only 30-40mph. Are you willing to drive a car into a tree 30-40mph without the protection of modern cars and a seat that I'm not sure is going to survive the impact so you will likely be going forward into the panel or worse. I don't think any of us would do this even in a modern car, that's pretty fast regardless. My guess is you'll likely impact near 50mph.
    Last edited by hawgdrvr; 01-03-2021 at 04:51 PM.

  8. #18
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    Default Re: BRS - Yes, I'm doing it

    Yikes, sorry to hear of those incidences involving friends. And I understand your perspective for a BRS.

    Modern technology is fantastic! Just to provide some personal context to go with your post, I have only been airworthy for 158 hours now. I have never flown a plane with so much information available.

    One cool tool you may have already used, but I had not, is the ADS-B "in". The airport I fly out of use to be 'small'. I could be the only one in the pattern. Now with modern migration from 'different' states, the airport is crazy busy. When I first flew the plane, it scared the XXXX out of me as I could now see all the ADS-B traffic. But that experience has developed into a greater understanding and safer flying as I can "see" the other planes. Great tool, even flying backcountry you can see the other aircraft as long as you are above the local radar.
    Dan Arnold
    KEUL

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