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Thread: Where is the Vernatherm valve on the Stroker 340

  1. #11
    Member TheCubWorks's Avatar
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    Default Re: Where is the Vernatherm valve on the Stroker 340

    The location of the oil PSI reading makes a huge difference. Because the oil PSI was adjusted by the engine builder the numerical display is just a feel good that the oil pump is working.

    Run it and smile!

  2. #12
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    Wink Re: Where is the Vernatherm valve on the Stroker 340

    My airplane is in the shop for it's first annual.
    I am having the cowl flaps installed as well as an oil filter kit and a vernatherm.
    I hope this solves my too hot cylinder head temps and my too low oil temp
    I will let you know when the weather warms up and I go home from Florida.
    Bill

  3. #13
    Senior Member Pete D's Avatar
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    Default Re: Where is the Vernatherm valve on the Stroker 340

    Make sure they take the original "pop-it" style oil pressure regulating valve out when they put the vernatherm in. They will hit each other if both are installed.


    Pete D

  4. #14
    Senior Member turbopilot's Avatar
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    Default Re: Where is the Vernatherm valve on the Stroker 340

    Quote Originally Posted by Pete D View Post
    Make sure they take the original "pop-it" style oil pressure regulating valve out when they put the vernatherm in. They will hit each other if both are installed.


    Pete D
    I have the vernatherm but have not installed it yet. Do you have a picture or diagram about the "pop-it" style oil pressure regulating value? Does it just occupy the same space as where you install the vernatherm?
    Bob Anderson, CC11-00316, N382RA

  5. #15
    Senior Member Pete D's Avatar
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    Default Re: Where is the Vernatherm valve on the Stroker 340

    edit.jpg

    The Yellow arrow is the plug that is replaced by the vernatherm.

    The Red arrow is the plug that would be removed, a spring and plunger removed, then the plug re-installed.

    Pete

  6. #16
    Senior Member chipallen's Avatar
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    Default Re: Where is the Vernatherm valve on the Stroker 340

    Same if the engine has the Oil Filter Adapter?

    Chip Allen

    SWT Aviation, Inc.
    Cubcrafters Southeast Sales Center
    Marietta, GA

  7. #17
    Senior Member Pete D's Avatar
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    Default Re: Where is the Vernatherm valve on the Stroker 340

    Affirmative. The brass plug (or vernatherm) would be removed from the oil screen housing and installed in the oil filter adapter if you were putting that on.

    Pete D

  8. #18
    Member Norm's Avatar
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    Default Re: Where is the Vernatherm valve on the Stroker 340

    Quote Originally Posted by turbopilot View Post
    This will assure getting internal (pre cooler) temperatures closer to the the boiling point of water, which is the goal.
    Maybe 180* F is perhaps the *ideal* oil temp but I wouldn't be concerned with lower temps on a sustained flight. Moisture will evaporate at much lower temps than the ideal temp stated above but just takes longer. Multi-viscosity oils are an important development in oil technology and assure proper lubrication at lower than ideal temps. (The 180* recommendation would probably be more important if a single viscosity oil is used.)

    BTW, I have a '07 Corvette that comes from the factory with an external engine oil cooler and in winter here in Eastern WA the oil temp never gets above 135* F on trips of any length. Temps are higher in the summer, of course.

    Anyway, just stirring the pot a little ...
    Last edited by Norm; 03-24-2011 at 09:41 AM.

  9. #19
    Senior Member turbopilot's Avatar
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    Default Re: Where is the Vernatherm valve on the Stroker 340

    Quote Originally Posted by Norm View Post
    Maybe 180* F is perhaps the *ideal* oil temp but I wouldn't be concerned with lower temps on a sustained flight. Moisture will evaporate at much lower temps than the ideal temp stated above but just takes longer. Multi-viscosity oils are an important development in oil technology and assure proper lubrication at lower than ideal temps. (The 180* recommendation would probably be more important if a single viscosity oil is used.)

    BTW, I have a '07 Corvette that comes from the factory with an external engine oil cooler and in winter here in Eastern WA the oil temp never gets above 135* F on trips of any length. Temps are higher in the summer, of course.

    Anyway, just stirring the pot a little ...
    Well unless the boiling point of water can be somehow changed, the only way you are going to get any amount of water from the liquid phase to the vapor phase is to heat it up above 212F somewhere in the oil distribution system of an aircraft engine.
    Bob Anderson, CC11-00316, N382RA

  10. #20
    Member Norm's Avatar
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    Default Re: Where is the Vernatherm valve on the Stroker 340

    Quote Originally Posted by turbopilot View Post
    Well unless the boiling point of water can be somehow changed, the only way you are going to get any amount of water from the liquid phase to the vapor phase is to heat it up above 212F somewhere in the oil distribution system of an aircraft engine.

    Turbopilot, moisture evaporates at 112* F. Heat water in a pan on the stove and check the temp with an infra red temp gun and notice the moisture rising from the pan. It just does it faster at 212* F. Isn't that correct?
    Last edited by Norm; 03-24-2011 at 09:42 PM.

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