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Thread: Belly Pods and CO levels

  1. #11
    Senior Member Dan L's Avatar
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    Default Re: Belly Pods and CO levels

    Quote Originally Posted by hawgdrvr View Post
    How did you add an extension? Pictures?
    680EDD07-614B-4AB0-A6A5-D3A97785C5F4.jpg

    Vetterman exhaust system. Clint made the extensions.
    Flying Carbon Cub EX #11 since 2011

  2. #12
    Senior Member N867SP's Avatar
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    Default Re: Belly Pods and CO levels


    So I hand fit the pod to the belly of my aircraft to remove any fitment issues. Then proceeded to tape up any gaps on the belly of the plane and test fly while taking readings. No difference. Readings only change when you change the pressure in the cabin. Go negative and the CO rises 300-400PPM at the openings at the seat base. Go positive and you can drop readings down to 10-40PPM. Remove pod and readings are 0PPM.

    Something is going on with the way the air is moving in front of the pod and driving the exhaust into the belly of the aircraft. I taped all openings, gaps, seams, joints, etc.

    With factory exhaust being tapered and flares at the end, extensions like Danís are not as easy.

    Will spend some more time this winter working they solutions.

    Pete


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    Pete
    ✈️CCK-1865-0078 N9PW
    Severna Park, MD W18

  3. #13
    Senior Member Dan L's Avatar
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    Default Re: Belly Pods and CO levels

    Readings in the hundreds is dangerously high. In my recent flying mine are now sub-ten.

    I'm wondering what openings in the seat base youíre referring too? Where the battery cables penetrate?

    Could the Heat valve box be the source? Theyíre not sealed real tight and I know from tracking oil stains my pod causes oil to flow into the direction of flight in that general area. The pod does strange things to the flow. A friend put a pod on his Citabria this spring and had a lot of weird airflow issues too, mostly with cylinder cooling.

    It looks like your blue tape should have covered the openings Bob mentioned where the gear attaches. Those are source of flow too.
    Flying Carbon Cub EX #11 since 2011

  4. #14
    Member hawgdrvr's Avatar
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    Default Re: Belly Pods and CO levels

    Quote Originally Posted by N867SP View Post

    So I hand fit the pod to the belly of my aircraft to remove any fitment issues. Then proceeded to tape up any gaps on the belly of the plane and test fly while taking readings. No difference. Readings only change when you change the pressure in the cabin. Go negative and the CO rises 300-400PPM at the openings at the seat base. Go positive and you can drop readings down to 10-40PPM. Remove pod and readings are 0PPM.

    Something is going on with the way the air is moving in front of the pod and driving the exhaust into the belly of the aircraft. I taped all openings, gaps, seams, joints, etc.

    With factory exhaust being tapered and flares at the end, extensions like Danís are not as easy.

    Will spend some more time this winter working they solutions.

    Pete


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    Great info! Giving me second thoughts on buying a pod. What are you using for a CO detector as I need to get one.
    Neal
    FX3 On Order (May 2021)
    Richmond, VA

  5. #15
    Senior Member N867SP's Avatar
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    Default Re: Belly Pods and CO levels

    Quote Originally Posted by Dan L View Post
    Readings in the hundreds is dangerously high. In my recent flying mine are now sub-ten.

    I'm wondering what openings in the seat base youíre referring too? Where the battery cables penetrate?

    Could the Heat valve box be the source? Theyíre not sealed real tight and I know from tracking oil stains my pod causes oil to flow into the direction of flight in that general area. The pod does strange things to the flow. A friend put a pod on his Citabria this spring and had a lot of weird airflow issues too, mostly with cylinder cooling.

    It looks like your blue tape should have covered the openings Bob mentioned where the gear attaches. Those are source of flow too.
    Yeah, the blue tape did cover the openings at the cabane vee to fuselage.

    The openings would be where to torque tube passes thru seat base at front and rear. Thatís where I had the highest readings. Other openings are grommeted and sealed pretty tight.

    If you keep the sky light vents pointed forward and cockpit pressurized numbers are low. If you open cabin heat and pressurize cabin numbers are low. If you turn skylight vents around to vent cabin into negative, numbers climb. As you lean the mixture numbers drop. Straight and level numbers. Weíre higher than climb or decent numbers.

    Just did 15hrs to and from WAD and weíre always able to keep numbers <50PPM but took some work in proper venting, luckily we had mild temps.


    Pete Meyer
    Severna Park, MD
    CCK-1865-0078
    N9PW
    Pete
    ✈️CCK-1865-0078 N9PW
    Severna Park, MD W18

  6. #16
    Senior Member N867SP's Avatar
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    Default Re: Belly Pods and CO levels

    Quote Originally Posted by hawgdrvr View Post
    Great info! Giving me second thoughts on buying a pod. What are you using for a CO detector as I need to get one.
    Ive been using the Fluke co-220, itís what I carried on my service truck doing HVAC service.


    https://www.grainger.com/product/4TP...9F1R6:20501231


    Pete Meyer
    Severna Park, MD
    CCK-1865-0078
    N9PW
    Pete
    ✈️CCK-1865-0078 N9PW
    Severna Park, MD W18

  7. #17
    Senior Member turbopilot's Avatar
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    Default Re: Belly Pods and CO levels

    Quote Originally Posted by N867SP View Post
    Ive been using the Fluke co-220, itís what I carried on my service truck doing HVAC service.


    https://www.grainger.com/product/4TP...9F1R6:20501231


    Pete Meyer
    Severna Park, MD
    CCK-1865-0078
    N9PW
    That looks like a professional device. For now I am using my Sentry working through ForeFlight. Sentry will alarm (with yellow light on device and popup on IOS ForeFlight) when CO goes above 30 ppm. It will then alarm with red light, audible alarm and IOS notification when CO ppm is above 50.

    The Sentry will not give direct PPM readings just threshold alarms. For grins I just ordered a $24 CO meter from Amazon with direct digital read out.

    With or without a belly pod, CO in the cockpit is a big deal. As I posted earlier just leaving a belly access plate off my CC raised CO above 50 ppm with a Sentry alarm. I suppose the same thing could happen if a stone put a hole in the belly fabric in the right place. One way or another, with or without a belly pod every airplane should have a CO monitor.
    Last edited by turbopilot; 10-15-2020 at 08:40 AM.
    Bob Anderson, CC11-00316, N382RA (soon CC11-00435, N94RA)

  8. #18
    Senior Member N867SP's Avatar
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    Default Re: Belly Pods and CO levels

    Quote Originally Posted by turbopilot View Post
    That looks like a professional device. For now I am using my Sentry working through ForeFlight. Sentry will alarm (with yellow light on device and popup on IOS ForeFlight) when CO goes above 30 ppm. It will then alarm with red light, audible alarm and IOS notification when CO ppm is above 50.

    The Sentry will not give direct PPM readings just threshold alarms. For grins I just ordered a $24 CO meter from Amazon with direct digital read out.

    With or without a belly pod, CO in the cockpit is a big deal. As I posted earlier just leaving a belly access plate off my CC raised CO above 50 ppm with a Sentry alarm. I suppose the same thing could happen if a stone put a hole in the belly fabric in the right place. One way or another, with or without a belly pod every airplane should have a CO monitor.
    Couldnít agree more. Placement of the device is important too. The levels of CO vary depending on the source and entry point. CO does not sink or rise but mixes. I take readings at waist level so I have a margin of safety from low entry point of CO to mouth and nose. Keep in mind that if you fly with pets as they tend to lay down and sleep in flight.


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    Pete
    ✈️CCK-1865-0078 N9PW
    Severna Park, MD W18

  9. #19
    Senior Member Dan L's Avatar
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    Default Re: Belly Pods and CO levels

    Flying Carbon Cub EX #11 since 2011

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