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Thread: Belly Pods and CO levels

  1. #91
    Senior Member Dan L's Avatar
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    Default Re: Belly Pods and CO levels

    Quote Originally Posted by Andy View Post
    I would have thought these tail openings would be insignificant compared to the huge holes provided for trim movement of horizontal stab.

    Isn't the likely solution to get the exhaust gas flow away from the fuselage? It's a while since I towed with Pawnees but I think there was an exhaust pipe extension that was intended to reduce cockpit CO levels. How does the exhaust outlet position compare between different CC models?

    Your snow pictures are making me wonder what I'm missing. Only 1 landing and 2 takeoffs on skis and no reason to buy them living in Arizona.
    I think the exhaust flow is pretty much confined to the under side. I have a Vetterman exhaust system, not the original CC style that has the breather plumbed into it. So I get some oil residue from the breather and it is all on the bottom. And the pod is probably changing the flow also. I wondering if the back side of the pod creates a little low pressure area and the two inspection covers there are some of my trouble? I had those taped this morning and removed that tape after my first stop.

    When I take the skis off for the season I may remove the pod for a while and see what that changes.

    Skis are the most fun you can have in a Cub IMO.
    Flying Carbon Cub EX #11 since 2011

  2. #92
    Senior Member Dan L's Avatar
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    Default Re: Belly Pods and CO levels

    A little more experimenting this week. Today in cruise I was seeing 4-5 PPM with just the seam between the boot cowl and the triangle belly cover taped. Landing saw mid teens. After some snowshoeing I removed the tape. In cruise flight I was now seeing a steady 10 PPM. Landing configuration was in the 20s.

    That joint was allowing about 5-10 PPM in the cabin. I suspect the teardrop elevator cover would have been too but it was already sealed on the inside from a few years ago. My guess is the face of the pod is creating some turbulence here.

    62C3F184-54D8-461E-A4DF-9B1AB3C99F8A.jpg

    In contrast, yesterday I flew the Cessna an hour to another airport and I never saw anything but zero PPM until I was setup for landing. At that point it crept up to 4 PPM. The return flight was exactly the same.

  3. #93
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    Question Re: Belly Pods and CO levels

    Is this a known issue in PA-18ís, as well as other experimental Cub kits?
    Not being able to safely utilize a pod would be frustrating for me, as most of our flights are full of gear into remote areas.
    J

  4. #94
    Senior Member turbopilot's Avatar
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    Default Re: Belly Pods and CO levels

    A cool morning in Palm Springs (unusual). Taxied out with windows and overhead vents shut. Heat was off. Belly pod was on. Got a CAS alert on the G3X as CO monitor detected 15 ppm while taxiing and doing run up. Once I took off CO fell to 4 ppm. After opening overhead vent CO drifted down to 0 ppm in flight.


    Bob Anderson, CC11-00435, N94RA

  5. #95
    Senior Member Dan L's Avatar
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    Default Re: Belly Pods and CO levels

    Quote Originally Posted by JohnnyR. View Post
    Is this a known issue in PA-18ís, as well as other experimental Cub kits?
    Not being able to safely utilize a pod would be frustrating for me, as most of our flights are full of gear into remote areas.
    J
    No I donít think it is a big issue. But the pod will change airflow patterns in this area a lot.

    The high quality detectors available now have made me much more aware of the issue. If someone is still using the little cards with the dot that can change color with exposure; I think youíre fooling yourself into thinking everything is fine. Small changes in flight configuration, like flaps deployed, or a small opening near the tail spring can make a big difference in immediate amounts of carbon monoxide entering the cabin. Without a sophisticated detector that responds almost as quickly, youíd never know.
    Flying Carbon Cub EX #11 since 2011

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