Page 4 of 17 FirstFirst 1234567891011121314151617 LastLast
Results 31 to 40 of 162

Thread: Building the EX3 - Tips & Hints

  1. #31
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2015
    Location
    Broken Arrow, OK
    Posts
    535

    Default Re: Building the EX3 - Tips & Hints

    WING

    Tapes & Patches

    Well, here's a picture of all 166 rivets in place through the reinforcement tapes into the center ribs ready to be riveted. What......you didn't want to spend the money on a pneumatic rivet puller????


    P1050739.jpg


    IMPORTANT: REMEMBER TO USE A RAG AND COVER THE EXHAUST PORT ON THAT PNEUMATIC RIVET GUN SO IT DOESN'T SPIT OIL ONTO THE FABRIC.

    P1050740.jpg

    Grommets are installed using PolyTak. I put it on the grommet and stick it onto the fabric. Caution: Get it exactly right over the tracing you did with pencil on the fabric before sticking it because once you touch the fabric, it's pretty much where it's gonna stay!

    Next you want to put down 2 coats of PolyBrush on all the tape areas. The first thing I do is to go down the wing and saturate the reinforcement tape (with the rivets in it) with brush. Don't brush it on.....just use the edge of the very wet brush and run it down the reinforcement tape and let it soak in good. If any is trying to run "outside the line", catch it but otherwise, let alot of the brush soak into the reinforcement tapes.

    Then go back over all the areas being sure to get a good coat of brush at least....to the outsides of the lines and a little over it. It doesn't really matter because it will all have brush on it eventually. With PolyBrush, the trick is not to over brush it. It dries REALLY FAST, just just get it down on the fabric and make a quick pass or 2 after its down to smooth it out some. Try not to leave a thick edge as it will show up later. If you try to keep brushing it after about 5-10 seconds (depending on the temps) after you lay it down, it will be drying and show the brush marks....so slosh it on, even it out and go on. If you get some puddles or splashes outside the lines, just run over it with the brush to smooth it out. If too much or you catch it after its dried, just use a rag with a little MEK to clean it up.

    Put 2 coats under all the places the patches will go as well. The patches go OVER the grommets. On the top of both wings there will only be the 1 teardrop grommet and patch for the pulley cover.


    P1050741.jpg

    Let it dry a couple hours between coats. The way I do it is that I just work on 1 side at a time. I just shrunk this side of the fabric at 350 degrees (the other, bottom side has only been shrunk at 250 so far and has no tape lines, rivets, etc) and I'll go ahead and mark the tape lines, put down 2 base coats of brush; install the tapes with another coat of brush and then come back after that dries and put a final coat on top of all everything. Then I will flip the wing over and do the same on the other side. I have a Bogert rotator but I don't use it on the wings until paint. I think it's easier and faster to just leave the wing on sawhorses until ready to go spray the PolyBrush; PolySpray and finish paint coats.

    Layout your 2" tapes and cut them to length. I start on the top of the wing and cut the 2" tapes by first cutting a round end that will go forward on the leading edge skins and I actually put the end 1/2" below (forward) of the rivets where the 3" tape goes. Just cut the round end and then go the width of the wing and go over the aft false spar and let it hang over about 6" and do a straight, pinking cut on that end. You can trace an outline on the end of the tape from a cardboard cutout if you want but I just fold the tape in half and cut a half moon on it and that works fine.

    P1050743.jpg

    P1050745.jpg


    Later, after we flip the wing over and do the other side, we will do a straight (not pinking) scissor cut on this end where the center of the 3" tape will be that goes over the false spars and aileron coves. For now, we will just install them with PolyBrush back to the aft edge.

    On the aft end of the wing tip box, the tapes that go over it, we will cut with straight scissors directly in the center of the wing tip bow. We will later cut the one from the other side at the same place and that joint will be covered last by the 3" tape that goes around the outside of the wing tip bow.

    P1050744.jpg

    Both the PolyFiber manual and Cubcrafters says ...... ".....when installing the tapes over the rivets and reinforcement tapes on the center ribs, you will not be able to get all the air bubbles out around the rivet heads......". Well, I have found a way where I can install them with the least amount of air bubbles I think. I'll try and make a little video showing me doing it but I'll explain as well in writing so as not to take so much download time for the video. It isn't perfect but I think it works the best.

    UPDATE: GO TO POST #63 ON THIS THREAD TO SEE A SHORT VIDEO OF ME INSTALLING TAPES OVER RIVETS.

    PolyBrush evaporates and gets thick really fast....EVEN IN YOUR CONTAINER. So don't put much fresh polybrush in you container (the one you are using to dip your brush into) at a time and once it starts getting thick, replace it because it will NOT work well on these rivet heads when it thick and setting up quickly. Remember, we are wanting to keep it so wet under the tape that the tape does not stick to the fabric on the sides yet so we can PUSH the air bubbles around the rivet heads out!

    The trick to it is this:

    1. First remember that we want it REALLY WET on top of the rivet heads/reinforcement tapes and the fabric where we are going to lay the dry 2" tape into. I know Cubcrafters says to do it dry......to lay the tape on it and then put the Polybrush over the top. I tried it that way a few times and it just doesn't work as well as having it really wet.

    2. We will start at the forward end on the leading edge skin (the rounded end of the tape). You should have you a pencil mark 1/2" below the rivet head that is inside the markings where the 3" tape will later go. Start by taking your very wet brush (I stick it into the brush, lightly touch it to the inside of the container to keep it from dripping and then applying it) and quickly just run a quick coat down between the lines where the tape will go getting it good and wet, then get your brush REALLY wet again and holding it sideways, just run it lightly along the reinforcement tape and rivet heads (even dab it at each rivet head to leave a puddle of brush). You actually want the brush to be pooling around the rivet heads. Don't brush it......just let it run off the brush onto the reinforcement tape and rivet heads. GO FAST.....it will dry fast....... If it dries at all or even gets "sluggish"....it won't work. Starting at the front just go maybe 7 or 8 rivet heads as you work from the front of the wing. We will do that first and then move to the rear and do the rest of the tape.

    3. Next wet your brush quickly again and leave it on top of your container to have it handy for after the next step.

    4. Take both hands and using your right hand (if right handed) hold the front of the tape while your left hand holds the tape so that it does not touch the wet brush you just laid down. Put the very front, rounded end of the tape right on your mark 1/2" down from the leading edge rivet while your left hand keeps the rest of the tape off the wing. Quickly now take your right hand and get your wet brush again (dip it and just touch the side of the brush on the side of the container to keep it from dripping too bad.)

    5. With the wet brush, go over the front of the tape you just stuck down and then start brushing down the center where the reinforcement tape and rivet heads are.....pushing the tape down into the wet brush as you go. The trick here is that you will work the air out of the edges of the reinforcement tape and around the rivet heads as you go. Since it's really wet, you can easily push the air out from the center and around the rivet heads towards the outside of the tape. Brush back away from you towards your left hand because you will be pushing the air out the backside as you go. Since you are holding the tape up with your left hand and only letting your wet brush push it down into the brush as it moves towards the aft end, the air has a way to escape. If you see air bubbles, just hold what you have and be sure your brush is wet and try and push it out from the center towards the outside edges where it can escape. THIS ONLY WORKS IF YOU HAVE IT REALLY WET UNDERNEATH AND THE POLYBRUSH HAS NOT BEGUN TO DRY. You have to move quickly on this as the brush sets up really fast. If you mess up, simply pull the tape up as far as you have to with your left hand until you have it straight or over the air bubble areas and do it again. As you go of course you will have your left hand holding the tape correctly so it's laying down between the lines you penciled in for the tapes.

    6. Be sure you don't leave too much brush on the outside edges, keep smoothing it out as you go before it sets up. If you leave a thick, irregular edge, you will see it through the paint. You can also go back later with some MEK and clean these areas up but easier to try and not do it to start with. After I have a section laid out and into the brush I make one last brush line over the tape on each side edge and ends to be sure it's smooth and not too thick. If you are too slow, you will be too late and just leave brush marks. If your brush seems to "drag" in the brush, it's too dry.....stop and leave it alone or put more wet on.

    7. Next just go to the aft end of the wing and lift it up just enough to do the same thing to the rest of the tape. When you get to the edge, just do the top part for now and let the extra tape hang off the back edge for now. We will straight cut these ends later and join the other side tapes where the joint will be under the 3" tape that goes in the aileron cove and false spar and you will never see it.

    8. Lastly, put on the 3" leading edge tape that will go over the seams of the 2 wing fabrics as well as the forward ends of all the 2" center rib tapes.

    P1050746.jpg
    NOTE that in this photo it shows the small tapes over the rivets behind the fuel tanks on the flap false spar. Cubcrafters changed this now that you don't install fabric rivets or these tapes over that false spar area. The Polybrush will stick to the full false spar metal now and be sufficient they say. So that 2nd and 3rd small tape strip from the wing root you will not do now.


    P1050747.jpg

    P1050748.jpg

    P1050749.jpg


    Note what order you put your tapes on around the fuel tank bays. The short tape over the aft end #2 tail ribs should go down first, then install the forward and aft edge (inboard to outboard running tapes around the fuel bay) tapes and then the forward to aft tapes that go over the #1 & #3 double ribs. Note that the tape that goes around the #1 rib will be 1 solid piece that goes all the way around the wing and joins with a straight cut just like the others, in the false spar area. Just to the top piece for now and clamp the tape to the wing on the bottom side until later.

    Then put on all the 2" rib tapes and then the 3" leading edge tape. Don't install the wing tip bow tape until you finish the bottom side.

    Also, on the round 5" grommets that are clear...be sure and file down the little teats that are on them from the injection molding process. If you don't file them down smooth, the patch will never go over it nice and even and will stick up and leave a very noticeable "bump" there.

    P1050755.jpg


    HERE IS ANOTHER PIECE OF INFO FROM CHUCK & RYANS BUILD THAT IS GOOD

    Taping wings

    Having never covered a plane before, it has quickly become apparent that once the basics are mastered the technique attendant to the details becomes critical. I can’t say if the following is right or wrong, but it worked for me.

    1. Covering the nav lights. There are two small fabric pieces to cover the top and bottom of the navigation lights. The bottom went on first. A bit of Poly Brush was used to hold down just the inner edge. Once dried the iron was used to shape the remaining section around the nav light, then Poly Brushed.

    The same technique was used to apply the top piece, but after ironing it to shape it was trimmed so the end seam was along the center line.




    2. Aft rib tip. A three inch tape was folded down the center to establish a center line. The aft end was held in place with a clamp. The tape was then pulled tight to cause the tape to tend to fold flat and additional clamps applied to about six inches of the nav light. Next the tape was ironed along the outer edges at about 250^ until it laid flat. Finally the Poly Brush was applied, removing clamps as it was glued. Once it dried sufficiently the clamps were removed and the end by the nav light was trimmed with a rounded end using a pattern and Poly Brushed in place.



    3. Forward tip. The forward tip can’t be clamped because it is too darn thick. So the tape was held at the forward leading end with a dime size dab of Poly Tack. Then after it set up another dime size dab was applied about three inches away, pulling it snug. After several dabs of Poly Brush were applied and dry, an iron was used to shape the tape and Poly Brush applied.





    Last edited by Daveembry; 04-27-2019 at 10:50 AM.
    Dave Embry
    "You only live once.....
    ..but if you do it right.....
    ....once is enough."..

  2. #32
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2015
    Location
    Broken Arrow, OK
    Posts
    535

    Default Re: Building the EX3 - Tips & Hints

    You are welcome....hope it helps.

    Quote Originally Posted by Dewey View Post
    Dave... as usual your information is priceless!
    i only wish I had emailed the forum sooner.
    many,many thanks.
    Dewey
    Dave Embry
    "You only live once.....
    ..but if you do it right.....
    ....once is enough."..

  3. #33
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2015
    Location
    Broken Arrow, OK
    Posts
    535

    Default Re: Building the EX3 - Tips & Hints

    POLY FIBER INFO:

    Just a little info here generally on using the Poly Fiber system. If you get the Poly Fiber manual and read it and then read the CubCrafters way of doing it....they don't jive. I questioned them extensively over the differences and they had plausible reasons and a long proven success record doing it their way......so.....I do it their way.

    CLEANING, ETC.

    When I’m ready to start applying the Poly Brush, before moving the parts into the paint booth, I take a leaf blower and spray it off really good to get all the dust, etc that has settled on the parts before going into the booth.

    Then i use Alcohol and a rag and go over the parts well to be sure and remove any grease, oil, etc. You can use the C-2210 Poly Fiber cleaner but I don’t.

    At the factory they don’t use it, they use the Zep’s spray glass cleaner on everything before and between coats. It’s good because it goes on as a foam so it isn’t too wet or thick going on. I buy it by the case off Amazon as it’s great for cleaning the windshield, bugs, etc. later when flying.
    https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B0...?ie=UTF8&psc=1

    I actually blow off the surfaces with a leaf blower first, then I use alcohol for the initial cleaning only, before the first coat of brush......just be sure and scrub off any grease, silicone (like if anything in your shop like WD-40, etc was in the air), oily fingerprints, etc. I use gloves when working with the parts from this point forward. After this first cleaning, I use the Zep’s before the next coats. I put it on first thing so there is plenty of dry time before spraying and then be sure and tak it off well with tak cloth after cleaning.


    So I blow it off, then alcohol it entirely, then tak it off real well before spraying.

    POLY BRUSH

    • You mix 3 part Poly Brush with 1 part of the reducer (2 different types of reducer depending on your temps) but R 65-75 seems to be most commonly used. The difference is the temperatures you are working in.
    • Put 2 coats down before putting down the tapes; then 1 coat with the tapes and then 1 final coat on top of the tapes after the install coat has cured.
    • Allow 2 hours minimum between coats. Best to let it sit 24 hours to let the MEK "gas off" completely before installing the next coat. Use a rag with MEK to remove any thick (“slick”looking) areas on the edge of the tapes as if these areas look slick now, they will also look slick under the paint later.
    • Next you will spray the Poly Brush onto a section about 3' x 3' with an HVLP using a 2.4 tip. Immediately wipe the brush into the fabric using a 4" foam brush. DO NOT overwork the Polybrush. You just want to smooth and even it out and you don't have much time to do that. Spray it quick......and then run the brush across the area maybe 1 time in either direction and then stop. If the brush starts to "drag" in the Poly Brush, it's too dry and you waited too long. You will leave streaks in it. So work quick! Smooth it and get out of there.
    • You do NOT brush the first coat on using a natural bristle brush as Poly Fiber says to do. They say to put the entire first coat of PolyBrush on the fabric using a paint brush. CC doesn't do that. The reason is that it's much too slow and you will end up with a "patch quilt" of areas you have brushed on (because it dries so fast you will have dry edges on wet edges, etc). Spraying and then smoothing with the foam brush leaves a nice, even finish....plus I like having the Poly Brush pushed down into the fabric with the air pressure of the spray gun.
    • After this coat has cured; spray only a 2nd coat.
    • When you first start to spray the 2 brush coats on the wings, first spray the leading edge areas (that has the sheet metal under it) and brush it in. Then do the rest of the wing and then go back over the leading edge a 2nd time before you stop (by doing it at the beginning and the end of your session, it will be dried from the coat you first put on when you started) . On the 2nd coat that you are only spraying on, you STILL want to brush in 2 coats onto the leading edge area. (so there are 2 coats brushed into the leading edge metal on each coat)
    • Before applying the first coat of Poly Spray (the "silver"), go over EVERYTHING on your fabric. Take your hobby iron and smooth out all seams, any glue lumps or globs of Poly Brush. The iron will take out virtually EVERYTHING. Also go down all the edges of the tapes with the iron and be sure they are ironed down to lay flat. If you used plenty of Poly Brush on the edges, then you shouldn't have many sticking up but I go over the edge of every tape with the iron at about 300 degrees and the edge will almost "melt" into the Poly Brush and look very nice. This takes alot of time but go over and over it with your eyes and your hands trying to feel any bumps or rough areas. Once your spray the Poly Spray, you can't do any ironing!! So do it now. You will think you have it really nice.....until you spray that first coat of Poly Spray! It will show every minor thing....every glob of poly tak glue you used too much of.....every hair from your cheap chip brush you used to apply the tak or PolyBrush; every glob of PolyBrush where you dripped it on the fabric and didn't clean it off.


    POLY SPRAY

    • You mix 4 parts Poly Spray with 1 part of the reducer. You do not do 3 cross coats (6 coats total; 3 in either direction as Poly Fiber says to do) but instead only do 2 coats total (not cross coats). You can do very minimal sanding between coats ONLY IF YOU NEED TO. No need to sand unless there is a problem with you having maybe sprayed it too dry (too far away from the surface). Any spray you sand you......you have to add back.
    • If the edges of the tapes comes up in any areas now you can sand them down. It's usually just a "tooth" or 2. If you do alot of sanding then you will have to spray another coat on. After the 2nd coat and before spraying your top color coats you can lightly wet sand if you think there is a need to but do it very lightly and only if there is a reason to. Poly Spray does NOT have to be sanded. Any areas you see that you would like to "fix" can NOT be done now. A bad spot (a glue seam, a hair from your paint brush, a clump of Poly Brush, etc) is UNDER the Poly Spray and should have been fixed before spraying. If you sand down now, you will just go to the PolyBrush and it doesn't sand.
    • Seems like many people think they have to do lots of sanding but you don't. Run your hand over the entire surface. If there is something there like some dust that got into the surface of Poly Spray or if you sprayed it "dry" (spray nozzle too far from the surface or not enough paint coming out of the gun, etc) it could be rough on the surface and you can lightly wet sand that to get it smoother but most of your top coat paints will go over any roughness in the Poly Spray and you will never notice it. The top coat paint (Like the PPG DUHS" that Cubcrafters uses) will fully cover that and smooth/level out over the spray. If you have watched your work as you progressed and have used the hobby iron on any excess glue, seams, tape edges, etc. then you will have little to worry about. The biggest problem I have Had is using way too much glue and not smoothing it out while it's still wet. It shows and is much harder to smooth out later. Just use a little glue when you apply it and be sure to either apply it smooth with the brush or be sure and smooth it out with your gloved hand or brush as you apply the fabric to it and before it sets up. Look close and get rid of any glue lines or globs or seams or glue now. Even if you have to iron the glue out it's much easier done now before it gets really hard.
    • Allow several days after the last spray coat to let it gas off before spraying on top coat color. If you don't, it will leave little "bubbles" or pinholes in the color surface.
    Last edited by Daveembry; 11-25-2019 at 07:12 AM.
    Dave Embry
    "You only live once.....
    ..but if you do it right.....
    ....once is enough."..

  4. #34
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Location
    Chandler, AZ
    Posts
    8

    Default Re: Building the EX3 - Tips & Hints

    I believe your instructions for thinning the Poly Brush and Poly Spray are backwards (see in red below). You should mix 3 parts Poly Brush with 1 part Reducer, and 4 parts Poly Spray with 1 part Reducer.

    Mike




    Quote Originally Posted by Daveembry View Post
    POLY FIBER INFO:

    Just a little info here generally on using the Poly Fiber system. If you get the Poly Fiber manual and read it and then read the CubCrafters way of doing it....they don't jive. I questioned them extensively over the differences and they had plausible reasons and a long proven success record doing it their way......so.....I do it their way.

    POLY BRUSH

    • You mix 1 part Poly Brush with 3 parts of the reducer (2 different types of reducer depending on your temps) but R 65-75 seems to be most commonly used. The difference is the temperatures you are working in.
    • Put 2 coats down before putting down the tapes; then 1 coat with the tapes and then 1 final coat on top of the tapes after the install coat has cured.
    • Allow 2 hours minimum between coats. Best to let it sit 24 hours to let the MEK "gas off" completely before installing the next coat.
    • Next you will spray the Poly Brush onto a section about 3' x 3' with an HLVP using 2.4 tip. Immediately wipe the brush into the fabric using a 4" foam brush. DO NOT overwork the Polybrush. You just want to smooth and even it out and you don't have much time to do that. Spray it quick......and then run the brush across the area maybe 1 time in either direction and then stop. If the brush starts to "drag" in the Poly Brush, it's too dry and you waited too long. You will leave streaks in it. So work quick! Smooth it and get out of there.
    • You do NOT brush the first coat on using a natural bristle brush as Poly Fiber says to do. They say to put the entire first coat of PolyBrush on the fabric using a paint brush. CC doesn't do that. The reason is that it's much too slow and you will end up with a "patch quilt" of areas you have brushed on (because it dries so fast you will have dry edges on wet edges, etc). Spraying and then smoothing with the foam brush leaves a nice, even finish....plus I like having the Poly Brush pushed down into the fabric with the air pressure of the spray gun.
    • After this coat has cured; spray only a 2nd coat.
    • When you first start to spray the 2 brush coats, first spray the leading edge areas (that has the sheet metal under it) and brush it in. Then do the rest of the wing and then go back over the leading edge a 2nd time before you stop (by doing it at the beginning and the end of your session, it will be dried from the coat you first put on when you started) . On the 2nd coat that you are only spraying on, you STILL want to brush in 2 coats onto the leading edge area. (so there are 2 coats brushed into the leading edge metal on each coat)
    • Before applying the first coat of Poly Spray (the "silver"), go over EVERYTHING on your fabric. Take your hobby iron and smooth out all seams, any glue lumps or globs of Poly Brush. The iron will take out virtually EVERYTHING. Also go down all the edges of the tapes with the iron and be sure they are ironed down to lay flat. If you used plenty of Poly Brush on the edges, then you shouldn't have many sticking up but I go over the edge of every tape with the iron at about 300 degrees and the edge will almost "melt" into the Poly Brush and look very nice. This takes alot of time but go over and over it with your eyes and your hands trying to feel any bumps or rough areas. Once your spray the Poly Spray, you can't do any ironing!! So do it now. You will think you have it really nice.....until you spray that first coat of Poly Spray! It will show every minor thing....every glob of poly tak glue you used too much of.....every hair from your cheap chip brush you used to apply the tak or PolyBrush; every glob of PolyBrush where you dripped it on the fabric and didn't clean it off.


    POLY SPRAY

    • You mix 1 part Poly Spray with 4 parts of the reducer. You do not do 3 cross coats (6 coats total; 3 in either direction as Poly Fiber says to do) but instead only do 2 coats total (not cross coats). You can do very minimal sanding between coats ONLY IF YOU NEED TO. No need to sand unless there is a problem with you having maybe sprayed it too dry (too far away from the surface). Any spray you sand you......you have to add back.
    • If the edges of the tapes comes up in any areas now you can sand them down. It's usually just a "tooth" or 2. If you do alot of sanding then you will have to spray another coat on. After the 2nd coat and before spraying your top color coats you can lightly wet sand if you think there is a need to but do it very lightly and only if there is a reason to. Poly Spray does NOT have to be sanded. Any areas you see that you would like to "fix" can NOT be done now. A bad spot (a glue seam, a hair from your paint brush, a clump of Poly Brush, etc) is UNDER the Poly Spray and should have been fixed before spraying. If you sand down now, you will just go to the PolyBrush and it doesn't sand.
    • Seems like many people think they have to do lots of sanding but you don't. Run your hand over the entire surface. If there is something there like some dust that got into the surface of Poly Spray or if you sprayed it "dry" (spray nozzle too far from the surface or not enough paint coming out of the gun, etc) it could be rough on the surface and you can lightly wet sand that to get it smoother but most of your top coat paints will go over any roughness in the Poly Spray and you will never notice it. The top coat paint (Like the PPG DUHS" that Cubcrafters uses) will fully cover that and smooth/level out over the spray. If you have watched your work as you progressed and have used the hobby iron on any excess glue, seams, tape edges, etc. then you will have little to worry about. The biggest problem I have Had is using way too much glue and not smoothing it out while it's still wet. It shows and is much harder to smooth out later. Just use a little glue when you apply it and be sure to either apply it smooth with the brush or be sure and smooth it out with your gloved hand or brush as you apply the fabric to it and before it sets up. Look close and get rid of any glue lines or globs or seams or glue now. Even if you have to iron the glue out it's much easier done now before it gets really hard.
    • Allow several days after the last spray coat to let it gas off before spraying on top coat color. If you don't, it will leave little "bubbles" or pinholes in the color surface.

  5. #35
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2015
    Location
    Broken Arrow, OK
    Posts
    535

    Default Re: Building the EX3 - Tips & Hints

    Good catch Mike! Thanks. Fingers typing different from brain! I got it changed. Thanks again.

    Quote Originally Posted by mwolf View Post
    I believe your instructions for thinning the Poly Brush and Poly Spray are backwards (see in red below). You should mix 3 parts Poly Brush with 1 part Reducer, and 4 parts Poly Spray with 1 part Reducer.

    Mike
    Dave Embry
    "You only live once.....
    ..but if you do it right.....
    ....once is enough."..

  6. #36
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Location
    Chandler, AZ
    Posts
    8

    Default Re: Building the EX3 - Tips & Hints

    My pleasure.

    I just about had a heart attack when I read it. I just finished taping out my first EX-2 wing.

    I can't begin to tell you how much I appreciate all your hard work on this forum. I find reading your "Building the EX-3" thread invaluable to finishing my EX-2 project.

    Thanks, and keep those posts coming.
    Mike




    Quote Originally Posted by Daveembry View Post
    Good catch Mike! Thanks. Fingers typing different from brain! I got it changed. Thanks again.

  7. #37
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2015
    Location
    Broken Arrow, OK
    Posts
    535

    Default Re: Building the EX3 - Tips & Hints

    FUSELAGE

    Well I took off a few weeks and went to Alaska so back and ready to get started on the fuselage now.

    NOTE that the forum only lets me put on 12 photos per post, so as I'm building and posting here, I will do a section or so and then stop and to save it, I go ahead and POST it to the forum. Then when I resume, I just "edit" the post and continue building until I get close to 12 photos being in that post and then I end it and start another post. So........just because I post a "post" on here and you read it, you might need to go back and read it again because I will keep adding to it via "editing" so if you read it and move on, you may miss some items I added at the bottom of the post.

    If you have one of the rotators (I use the Bogert one), then go ahead and install the fuse to it. Note that when mounting the front that the SHORT arm goes DOWN. Done like this, it is almost perfectly balanced. I build the first build with it the opposite and couldn't understand why it didn't balance!!!

    P1050874.jpg

    P1050875.jpg

    As before on the WING, I am only going to address issues which may be confusing; missing in the manual or something that may just need more explanation and I am not going over every section of the manual. If you have any specific questions about any areas that I don't address, please just make a post here and ask and I'll be glad to expound if I can.

    When inspecting the fuse, take a look at the new throttle and prop attach points on the left side. The first few EX3 fuselages didn't have the side here welded and they ask that you have it welded if it isn't already. I'm not sure how many went out of the factory without this weld point but Mitch probably already contacted those that needed to do this.

    P1050876.jpg

    I want to stress again that you need to be working off the DROPBOX FUSELAGE MANUAL and only refer over to the printed version once you are SURE it is correct and up to date for the page you are looking at. I open Dropbox and go by that manual and then refer over to the printed manual only to look at figures, etc so I can write on it as I pull parts but only after checking to be sure the printed version is the same as the Dropbox version. Mitch can update the Dropbox manual instantly when he finds a correction or addition, so it's always more updated that the printed version.

    MANUAL PAGE 16, Fig. FS3. Note that if you are installing the STAINLESS STEEL BRAKE LINES that you will replace the SP96002-001 90 degree angle fitting on the top of the MASTER CYLINDER with the one that should be provided with the stainless steel kit. AN822-4D.

    Manual Page 18, photo 011 is wrong. According to Fig. FS2 on page 15 shows the parts callout and there are not 2 washers used as shown in the photo where the top of the pedal (small piece) attaches to the bottom (larger piece) pedal. According to the figure (which is always followed if there is a conflict between photos and figures) there is only an AN960-416 washer on the bolt head and under the nut of the bolt. They show 2 washes on each end of the bolt and that is not correct. The bottom of the pedals that attach to the floor attach fittings do have a washer between the 2 pieces but not the tops.

    Page 23 Torque Tube Pre-Assembly.

    NOTE: I DO NOT DO THIS NOW. THERE IS NO REASON TO PUT THE FRONT MAST ON NOW BUT INSTEAD GO DO IT WHEN YOU DO THE REST OF THE TORQUE TUBE INSTALLATION ON PAGE 93 OF THE MANUAL.

    The EX2 had a smaller torque tube that was made of aluminum and the masts are aluminum.....so no primer was needed as is needed on the EX3 torque tube which is made of steel and the mast of aluminum. In this case, you have to mix up the 3 parts for the primer and it has a 1 hour shelf life, so if you put the front mast on now and the rear later, you will have to mix twice. No big deal but there is just no reason to do it now so I don't. Wait until you do the entire TORQUE TUBE assembly.

    Note that if you are looking for the 21 HDW-CR3213-5-3 rivets needed, they are listed on the packing slip and Tote 1 without the "HDW". So just look for CR3213-5-3 without the HDW.

    How do you de-burr the insides of the torque tube and masts? I like my Dremel tool with a small sanding drum. I have 2 Dremels and I have 1 with the sanding drum and the other with a cut-off blade on it at all times. I use each so much I don't have to change bits around each time I use them.

    P1050877.jpg

    FUEL SELECTOR

    UPDATE!. MITCH UPDATED THAT THE FACTORY IS NO LONGER USING FUEL LUBE OR EZ LUBE ANYWHERE ON THE AIRCRAFT ANY LONG DUE TO SOME ISSUES WITH IT. HE NOW SAYS THEY ARE USING THE LOCTITE 567 THREAD SEALER ON ALL PARTS OF THE AIRCRAFT NOW SO PLEASE SUBSTITUTE THIS WHERE YOU SEE MY FORUM POSTS ABOUT USING FUEL LUBE.

    When using the Fuel Lube (EX-TURN) only put it on the pipe threads which are where the 3 metal fitting go into the fuel selector and do not use it on the other plastic fittings that use the compression nuts, inserts, etc.

    When using Fuel Lube be sure and put just a small bead around the threaded end of the fitting and do not get any on the first 3 threads and be careful none gets on them so it won't accidentally get into the fuel selector valve and clog it up possibly. It's sticky stuff! Also Fuel Lube is great to use just a dab on the end of your finger or in a box end of a wrench when you need to hold a part (like a little nut, etc) in an area where you can't get your hand into......because it's so sticky. Fuel lube is only used on fitting associated with "fuel"...(doh!) because it's not fuel soluable. Thread sealer Loctite 567 is better for other threaded fittings.

    Of course don't tighten the compression fitting yet. The ends of the fuel lines will go into them later.

    P1050878.jpg

    FLOORBOARD

    Line up a couple of the holes in the floorboard with the holes pre-drilled and tapped in the fuse (I use an awl when working on these parts to line up holes) and check to see that it fits good. Mark any areas that need a little sanding (dremel tool). You may need to trim a little around some of the edges where it meets the crosstube, especially being sure none of the weld joints are touching the floorboard and keeping it from lying flat against the fuselage crosstubes.

    You will also note that you will most likely have to trim the very front of the heat duct where it exits the cabin into the firewall area. Here you can see where I used a straight edge to go from the tubes on either side of the duct to see where it will hit and marked it for trimming. This part of the floorboard should hit the firewall flush when installed and so far, all the floorboards I got were a little too long at that point.

    P1050879.jpg

    P1050880.jpg


    Also, it's easier to install several of the parts that go under the seat base now, instead of later when it's installed in the fuse. Check out the Executive Glass Manual around page 23 and I install the solenoids, big fuse holder (with meth); ignition breakers and also install the black trim box now.

    REAM HOLES IN FUSE

    Something you won't see in the manual but is very important at this point is to ream all the holes in the fuse that you will be using later to install the wings, landing gear and struts. They are much better now at blocking out most of the powder coat into these but the wing attach fitting must be very precise and the strut attach holes are totally IMPOSSIBLE to get to after you cover and paint and they always have to be reamed.

    Use a 5/16" reamer on the 4 wing attach points at the top of the fuse and on the 2 gear attach fittings on the bottom side of the fuse.

    P1050881.jpg
    Wing Attach Fittings


    P1050882.jpg
    Inside or Bottom Gear Attach Fittings

    Use a 3/8" reamer on the 4 side gear attach fittings and on the strut attach fitting.


    P1050883.jpg
    Side or outboard Gear Attach Fittings


    P1050884.jpg
    Strut Attach Fittings
    Last edited by Daveembry; 05-10-2019 at 12:35 PM.
    Dave Embry
    "You only live once.....
    ..but if you do it right.....
    ....once is enough."..

  8. #38
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2015
    Location
    Broken Arrow, OK
    Posts
    535

    Default Re: Building the EX3 - Tips & Hints

    FUSELAGE

    Bottom Pulleys & Cables

    The manual has Section 10 on Page 28 as installing bottom pulleys. Originally this was done later in the fuse build but with the EX3 the very front pulley (that attaches to the front stick) needs to be installed before the floorboard is installed. So I would use FS9, View F & K to install these 2 pulleys. The last 2 kits I have not had AN24-13 (the bolt that goes through the aft, front pulley) missing and had to have Mitch send it so see if you are also missing that and get it coming from Mitch if not.

    For now IGNORE the top part of VIEW F where it shows the 2 long bolts going through the floorboard with big washers and lock nuts. That isn't done now but later.

    For now, just install these pulleys and the 1 cable SK95300-001 that wraps around the front pulley and will connect to the front stick later.

    On Page 29 it has FS10 which shows the far rear (near the elevator trim motor location) double pulley installation. You DO NOT DO THIS NOW because you will have to route the cables through other parts first (like through the rear of the floorboard) but note that the cables will go UNDER the pulleys and come up into the fuse on the aft side. The cables will come from the very front pulley (at the front stick) and go INSIDE the fuse and under the seat and then drop down UNDER the fuse where the bottom stringer attaches to the fuse and then both cables go on back to that rear pulley but you will have to have the floorboard and rear stick mast attached first to route the cable through them before you can run the cable through this back double pulley. SO SKIP THIS PART FOR NOW! Just let that front cable lie on the fuse for now. Come back after you have installed the floorboard, torque tube and stick masts and finish the rear cable pulleys.

    P1050887.jpg

    Also note that when looking at FS10 showing the rear double pulley, that you may not be able to use the AN416 washer shown under the castle nut. If you do, the nut won't tighten enough to get the cotter pin into the hole. See if an AN416L will work (half washer). That is fine since you will notice there is no washer under the bolt head either and is not needed. You DO need the 4 other AN416 washers as show inside the bracket. On castle nuts make sure you snug them up and align with the hole in the bolt. Check the pulley that it turns freely and I keep tightening the nut until the pulley starts to bind a bit and then I back it back off 1 opening in the nut and install the cotter pin.

    On this pulley bracket, without the nut even being tightened, the pulleys were too snug and wouldn't turn easily so I gently spread the bracket out a bit so they would turn more easily.

    P1050888.jpg


    EXTENDED BAGGAGE

    The aluminum pieces that make up the floor, sides, etc have a protective plastic film. I peel back the edges where I will be riveting, etc. before installing it but I always leave that plastic on until completely finished with the plane. The aluminum scratches very easily. I always use the CubCrafters lightweight carpet kit they sell and I install it now as well. Just peel it back at least 1" or so around all 4 sides of each piece as you install them.

    The manual is pretty self explanatory. Remember to pull all the rivets from the inside of the baggage area to keep the small heads on the inside. I didn't find it necessary to remove the back piece to drill out the holes for the rudder cables, I just drilled a small pilot hole from the outside of the fairlead metal circle on the fuse in the center and then from the inside used a step drill to widen that hole to 3/4". I also did not remove the panels to rivet. Once I put them in, I drilled the fairlead holes; installed the D-Rings; drilled and cleco'd the holes and riveted.....while leaving the panels in place. It’s simple to de-burr them while still in place.

    ALSO, I don't install the right side fairlead onto that forward, right side panel of the baggage compartment until after I go to fit the inside panels as well as the rudder cables.

    HOWEVER, if you install your rudder cables onto the rudder pedals and run them through all the fairleads (see post later on these details) I liked to pull the cable tight......then center the cable in the fairlead that is going through the back of the baggage area and center it on the fairlead in the fuse that is just forward of the baggage compartment (but aft of the rear seat rudder pedal). Then holding the cable tight, you could move that fairlead and bracket that we have to rivet to the baggage panel, up and down until it's centered and it would be perfect.....BUT......that doesn't work because if you later go to install that rear, right side interior panel, you will see that if you put the fairlead there, it will be about 1-1/4" too low to fit into the slot already made for it in the panel. The center of the fairlead has to be about 5" up off the floor to fit the panel.

    SO, put that panel in place and then mark and rivet that fairlead bracket. It should be 5" up to the center and then be sure it's either forward or aft of the fuse tube that is right there in that area so the back of the rivets don't hit it.

    FUSE MANUAL, Page 41, Section 13 Reinforcement Installation. This I would not rivet now. You can get it in position and match drill into the back of the back panel but just leave as clecos for now and finish the installation when you go to meth everything in place. The manual isn't quite right where it says to "...position the reinforcement angle in such a way that you get it as close to the tube as possible....". In reality, if you have the baggage door frame in position, you will see that this piece actually sits up against the inside of the door frame and not the fuselage tube itself. Note a big deal but if you position and rivet it without the door frame in place, it won't work.

    I just hold it up to where it's tight against the baggage door frame (and it is up against the fuselage tube) and then drill the holes and cleco for now. Later when I meth it all it, I will apply meth to the inside of this piece before riveting it to the back piece.

    Extended Baggage Door

    A couple of things to pay attention to here. If you don't get this right here, the door will not close good. Note that the hinge will fold over completely on one side but not completely on the other side. Be sure you are installing the LONG side of the hinge on the door and that it goes on with the side on the door that, when you fold the hinge back towards the "inside" of the compartment, it will not fold completely flat like shown in this photo. This will allow the door to close but also to open completely and lie against the side of the fuse when open.

    You can see that the long side of the hinge is already countersunk at the factory on 1 side, so that is the side that will go onto the face of the door.

    P1050890.jpg

    P1050891.jpg


    Next be sure that you lower the hinge enough so that when it's "closed" in the fuselage, it allows the hinge to fully fold over. In other words, if you push the hinge up higher on the door itself, it may be too high to let it bend over the lower edge of the door and keep it from completely operating to let it shut completely. If you do this, then when you go to close the door, it will stop before coming flush with the rest of the baggage door frame in the fuse. Note that the bottom of the door frame IS NOT FLAT but has a pretty good slope to it (higher in the back or inside and sloping outwards to drain water I assume), so if you make your hinge so it stops at 90 degrees, that isn't going to work. It has to actually be more so it will lie flat on the sloped bottom of the door frame WHEN THE BOLTS AND NUTS ARE TIGHTENED. If you just set it up there and not look to be sure the hinge is sitting flat and flush with that sloped bottom, it will look like it's working good but once you install and tighten the bolts/screws up in the bottom hinge, it will pull the door downward and not fit nicely in the opening.

    P1050892.jpg

    P1050893.jpg


    Here you can see I use clothespins to hold the hinge in place and then put it on a flat surface to be sure it will go at least 90 degrees and allow the hinge to fold over and not get hung up on the bottom of the door and not allow it to hinge over completely.

    Then set it up in the door frame on the fuse and then clamp the hinge to the frame from the inside.

    P1050896.jpg


    Be SURE you push the bottom right corner (as viewed from the outside) of the door frame from the inside, to make it flush with the fuse tube. If you don't, the door will bow out at the top, left corner as you see here. This will fool you into thinking something is wrong.

    P1050894.jpg


    At this point, you have 2 clecos in the hinge on the outside of the door. Take a couple pieces of tape and tape to the door in the top corners but don't tape it to the frame yet. Then remove one of the clecos (right or left) and you can move the door up or down at that corner to make all the edge reveal distances the same all the way around the door. Once you have that, then press the other end of the tape to the door frame to hold it in place. You can then go ahead and drill all the rest of your hinge holes and cleco as you go. Then you can open and close the door and check that it works good. (Remember to keep that bottom right corner pulled/pushed out flush with the fuse tube there to keep it square).

    P1050898.jpg

    Once you think it's good, then go ahead and add a couple more strong spring clamps on the hinge on the inside. Then open the door and go ahead and match drill the holes from the other side of the hinge down into the door frame and you are done.

    P1050899.jpg


    When installing the rivets and washers into the door hinge, I found that the hinge needs to be countersunk a little more than it comes (it's pre-drilled and already countersunk) to make the rivet heads flush with the hinge.

    NOTE that the written portion of the manual on page 45 lists the rivets used to install the 1/4 turn receptacles wrong. It's missing some numbers. Looking at Fig. FS16 you can see they rivets used are MS20426A4-6. The "A4" part is missing on the manual.

    You can use your hand de-burring tool to do small numbers of countersunk areas instead of the countersink tool.

    P1050900.jpg


    P1050901.jpg


    After you install the 1/4 turn receptacles, double check that the 3/8" drilled center holes are truly centered on the receptacle center hole. If it isn't, you can use a dremel tool with the straight bit to trim the sides a little if need be. If they aren't centered there will be problems later when installing the fastening hardware.

    Also at this time, I go ahead and pull the parts needed to finish the door like the bottom hinge screws/washer/bolts and the turn fasteners, etc and put them in a plastic bag and put them in my FINISH box labeled as such. That way I save time later on the finish after paint in having to go back and look up and pull parts needed. I mark the parts in yellow highlighter in my manual as I do with all the other parts as I find and use them but I put a note in the manual that I have put these in a bag and into the finish box so I know in case I don't remember.

    Also NOTE that the Fig FS16 shows using all HDW-85-11-200-20 Studs (the part that screws into the 1/4 turn receptacles) however they are shipping 2 of the 200's and 1 of the 220's. This number indicates how long the stud is. You may find that after you have installed the fabric and patch over these areas after cover and paint, that to get it to close nice that you might have to use a different length of stud. There is also a shorter 180 in the totes as well, so you have some choices. You won't install these until the very end of the project so just stash them all away in your finish box for now.
    Last edited by Daveembry; 06-04-2019 at 01:11 PM.
    Dave Embry
    "You only live once.....
    ..but if you do it right.....
    ....once is enough."..

  9. #39
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2015
    Location
    Broken Arrow, OK
    Posts
    535

    Default Re: Building the EX3 - Tips & Hints

    FUSELAGE

    Extended Baggage Door Assembly Installation
    - Starting on Page 48 of the manual.

    OK....we have already drilled the holes for the bottom of the hinges on the door frame and there is no need to have the door still in the frame so just set it aside now and the rest you can do without it being in the way.

    After everything is all in and fitted for the frame, then you can follow the manual and drill the 3 holes out for the 1/4 turn fasteners that will go through the door. Try to really center the #30 pilot holes you drill through the 1/4 turn receptacles on the door frame into the door itself. It's important that the hole be close to the center or it won't work good.

    Also, don't try to really test the fit too much now on how much pressure it takes to close the fasteners when turning them to the closed position because you still have to install the fabric and a patch over the door frame, so it's gonna change. Just be sure the holes line up and are centered for now then do the final fit of the 1/4 turn fasteners later, after fabric, patch and paint.

    When you are installing the extended baggage sidewall around the baggage door, on the INSIDE of the door, the “tab” goes OVER the door frame (up at the top) and the front and bottom areas have the sidewall go UNDER the “lip” of the door frame. Later you will tuck the carpet (if you get the carpet kit) up under these 2 “lip” areas.


    A6086182-6429-48D7-9E7D-15972A927C33.jpg


    4F6E16E7-B4B3-4472-AFFC-2A575670DC60.jpg
    (The red arrows are pointing to the 2 areas where the lip is and the blue one is pointing to the “tab”.)

    NOTE, photo 049, 55 and 56 are incorrect. They are correct in showing that the "Extended Baggage Door Frame Extension - Long" goes on the lower, right side of the baggage frame but the part was changed to be more rectangular with the top, right side of it squared off now instead of being curved like shown in the photo. The part number shown in Fig. FS18 SC90101-001 is in fact correct and should look like this installed.

    P1050908.jpg

    NOTE: Page 49. It seems strange now that you might want to "....think about attaching the fuel lines to the stringers and fuselage tubes." This seems pretty funny but you have to know why it got this way.

    The EX3 manual used the EX2 manual but made some pretty big changes in the order of the way the fuse is assembled. In the EX2 we first installed all the stringers and fuel lines before doing this baggage door, so this was written with that in mind. Of course we have not installed fuel lines, stringers, etc so it seems strange but what the intent here is that when you go to putting the meth around the extended baggage areas, the fuel lines will be attached to the fuse tubes with friction tape and tie wraps so you don't want to put solid beads of meth all along every single tube around the baggage area. Instead, we put short beads maybe 6" long and then skip several inches before the next bead. This makes it lighter and also gives you places to put the tape and tie wraps around the tubes to attach the fuel lines. I am not going to bond the baggage area panels until after I have installed the stringers and fuel lines.

    So just ignore this for now and don't do any meth on these baggage area panels yet. I will go ahead now and bond the baggage door frame now so I can go ahead and get these extension pieces in and bonded and then start using the body filler to smooth the joints.

    These parts are just going to be installed using some of the meth by applying it to the door frame and just sticking it to it and then using long, straight edges to be sure it is flush with the fuse tubes on either side.

    I use a clamp with a short piece of wood to pull that bottom, right corner of the door frame up tight and flush against the fuse tube.

    P1050902.jpg

    Remember later that you are going to have a stringer butting up under the baggage door frame, so the extensions you want the bottoms to be flush with the bottom of the door frame. The right one just push up until its flush or higher but the left one you may have to cut the bottom off 3/8" or so to be sure it's not sticking down below the bottom of the door frame.

    Also note that these extensions (especially the left one) won't actually sit up flush against the door frame because the door frame is not square, so use your long straight edge and just make sure the top, middle and bottom of each extension is flush with the straight edge when it's touching the door frame and the closest fuse tube. Your fabric will stretch between the door frame and that next tube, so you want these extensions to be flush or just under that line so it doesn't show underneath.

    P1050910.jpg
    Here is the gap that is on the left extension at the bottom. The back of the extension is touching the door frame but to keep it flush on the straight edge, it has to be angles so that leaves a gap that will be filled later with body filler.


    P1050909.jpg

    Just apply meth to the extensions and stick them against the door frame and as it dries, just keep checking they stay flush until it dries. Don't worry about getting alot of meth on them. We are going to fill in the gaps with auto body filler so make a smooth transition.

    I don't like these extensions because even it you get them perfect, you will always see them on the finished airplane. When we cover, there is also a patch that goes completely around the baggage door frame and these extensions and the patch is always visible as well. I asked why they were even needed and if I could just eliminate them as I could see no purpose for them but was told that the reason you have to use them is that the polytak and polybrush will not stick good enough to the carbon fiber baggage door frame that it will wrap around when installing. So they are simply to hold the fabric tight I guess??

    You will have to cut the bottom of the right one after you get the stringer installed later. It will look like this:

    P1050935.jpg


    P1050903.jpg


    P1050904.jpg


    P1050905.jpg


    P1050906.jpg


    P1050907.jpg

    We will come back later to bond the rest of the baggage area.
    Last edited by Daveembry; 05-18-2019 at 08:48 AM.
    Dave Embry
    "You only live once.....
    ..but if you do it right.....
    ....once is enough."..

  10. #40
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2015
    Location
    Broken Arrow, OK
    Posts
    535

    Default Re: Building the EX3 - Tips & Hints

    FUSELAGE

    Running the cable end through the floor at the rear stick.

    When you run the swagged cable end through the floorboard to. The rear stick mast, it won’t fit. At least not easily. The “slot” in the floorboard is too narrow. I have been able to take some pliers and turn it sideways and force it though with no damage but you probably will have to file the opening a little to get it to go through sideways.

    749F9660-92AC-4625-B988-461A3B8A2A08.jpeg


    Rudder Cable Fairleads

    Manual Page 58. This is not correct for the EX3. To start with all this info was for the EX2 where you had to install them on either side of the baggage area but in the EX3 the factory installed the left fairlead welded into the fuse so you would think that was the correct height (4" up from the bottom tube) but it seems to be too high to me. Later we will install the cables and you will see it hits the top so I would not put the right fairlead on the side of the baggage panel until later when we run the cables so we can get the cable centered. You will have to make it about 28" or less from the back of the baggage area fairlead because you don't want the rivet holes to be over the outside fuse tube when you install the rivets. The factory welded the left side at around 28-1/2" so 28" make it OK.

    The old manual use to have the floorboard and pedals installed 1st thing and then stringers and fuel lines but on the EX3 Mitch changed it all around to put the floorboard in much later. As a result, many of the items here in the manual are out of sequence and can't be done until later, so you will have to go back and forth for now. I'll work with Mitch to change up the order hopefully to get it back in the correct order.

    We are not going to run the rudder cables yet so just ignore the info about running the rudder cables right now. We will do that after the floorboard and pedals are all in.

    Going on through the manual, we are also going to skip Section 21, Page 60 for FORWARD BAGGAGE FLOOR. We will come back and install this after the front floorboard/seat base is installed.

    Page 63, Section 22 BAGGAGE DOOR FASTENERS. Skip this until after the plane is covered and painted.

    Page 65, Section 23. BAGGAGE FRAME BLENDING. Skip this until after the stringers are installed.

    Page 67, ELT ANTENNA INSTALLATION.

    Looks like the antenna bracket number has changed to SC91033-001. I had to take my step drill and widen the hole just a tad for the antenna to go through the bracket.

    I also have been mounting mine down lower on the back wall of the baggage area to make it more accessible from the bottom access panel that will be there in the fuse to more easily get to it.

    NOTE: I WOULD CERTAINLY COMPLETELY HOOK UP THE ANTENNA AND COAX CABLE TO MY ELT AT THIS POINT AND TEST IT BEFORE COVERING. On my last build, the last thing I did probably was to put the 90 degree coax connector at the end of the antenna where it hooked up to the ELT under my seat and tested it. It came back with a negative test (see the Kannad manual if that's your model for error codes ...there are beeps and red flashing lights on power up/test) and I figured it was ANYTHING but the actual unit. Surely I didn't have a connector installed correctly or something. But after replacing and testing everything else, Mitch sent me another ELT unit and sure enough, it was just the unit!! SO TEST IT NOW!

    CHUCK AND RYAN went over this in their forum post so I will post it here again for your convenience. This is how I've been doing mine as well.

    We decided to go with the Cubcrafters ELT ( Kannad ) and RAMI antenna after looking at several alternatives.The antenna is mounted on the back of the extended baggage with a specific bracket that sets the antenna perpendicular to the mounting surface. We measured 10 inches from the base of the extended baggage and centered the hole, working inside the baggage compartment. Once mounted with a 6/32 x 3/8 bolt and nyloc nut (Dave note: See Fig. FS23 for callout of parts), the remaining two holes were drilled. We opted for a lower location than specified by Cubrafters.. Reason? To make the antenna and the coax connection accessible from the inspection port on the bottom of the fuselage.



    I am a bit anal about using dielectric grease on any connections that can potentially carry an electric current, including nuts/bolts, plugs, and electrical connectors. The extended baggage is effectively grounded to the airframe by the row of screws on the forward bottom end. Antennas like to work against an effective ground plane (no pun intended). So a bit of dilectric grease was used on those three nuts and bolts holding the bracket to the back of the extended baggage.


    When routing the RG-142 coax we looped it below the antenna to provide a bit of slack, should it become necessary to disconnect it from the bottom inspection port after it is covered. The bracket was also arranged so the coax connector could be easily accessed from the bottom for the same reason.I have noticed that Cubcrafters has a real affection for black friction tape. It seems that any place two dissimilar materials come together it is wrapped in friction tape. So I was liberal (I hate that word) in using friction tape when securing the coax cable. As routed, the cable provided by Cubcrafters was the correct length with no trimming.

    The antenna sets on the same plane (double meaning) as the lower stringers. The rib stitching tape was tied off at the point where the stringers and the airframe cross for a nice, neat, installation. The frame and antenna were wrapped with friction tape before the tape was tied in place.




    The RG-142 cable was wire tied in place at about 8” intervals along the inside of the stringer. A grommet was added (not supplied with the kit) where the coax passes through the right front fabric spacer support.




    THANKS CHUCK & RYAN FOR THAT!

    PAGE 69, Section 26 ELEVATOR CABLE FAIRLEADS BLOCK

    NOTE: In addition to scuffing up the surface of the fuse for the meth to hold onto when installing the blocks, we need to drill holes in the blocks as well. The old material they used adhered to the meth much better than it does to the new plastic they are making them out of now. As a result, the meth will not hold well and pop off so Mitch has us now drill a few holes in the plastic blocks where the meth will go so the meth can go down in there and grab hold. This is not structural and is really only to hold everything in place until you get the fabric on (which will hold the bottom stringer in position). I just put the bungees on as I install them and leave the bungees on until I cover the fuse.

    I just used a #30 bit and drilled 4 holes on each side of each piece.


    P1050911.jpg


    Page 73. Fuel Low Point Drain

    Nothing here too difficult but I thought I'd throw in that when you are installing the white, plastic insert (SC60103-001) into the compression fittings, it's best to "pop" it in place in the nut before installing the fuel line. You take the small end of the insert (note it has a little "rim" around the outside edge to hold it in place) and push it through the nut until it pops in place. I can use one of my Uniball pens to push it through. It's not a big deal but you just have to pay attention if you wait and install it when you put the fuel line in, just be sure and watch carefully as you tighten the nut that the fuel line is straight into the nut as you tighten so the pressure will be equal around the insert and that it pops out completely through the nut as you tighten. If you get it started crooked, it will get jambed up and crimped and you will have to replace it.

    You can see them photo below of me using an ink pen to push it through but Gordon Gilchrist came up with a better way of using a silver cleco and pliers to push the inserts through like this:

    435F31CB-D3FC-4247-A29F-04DAF5CFB5E2.jpg
    Thanks Gordon.

    You will probably have to clean the powder coat off the inside of the fuse fitting so it will go through.

    Also note that you will NOT use any EZ Lube (aka Fuel Lube) on ANY of the compression fitting at this time. ALSO CUBCRAFTERS HAS STOPPED USING EZ LUBE (aka Fuel Lube) ON ANY PARTS ANY MORE. THEY ARE USING THE LOCTITE 567 THREAD SEALER INSTEAD.

    Fittings that are all metal and have the beveled end will use this 567 thread sealer. In this case, it will NOT be any parts shown in FS25 on Page 74. When you install the quick drain fitting (later after cover and paint) in the low point drain you will use it on that fitting but the manual is wrong here on page 73 where is says to use fuel lube on the fittings. It's referring to later when you install the fuel line/drain valve, etc.

    P1050912.jpg
    Here you can see using an ink pen to set the insert. The cleco works better though.


    While I was using the meth to glue the stringer blocks, I went ahead and did a little tacking of the extended baggage panels in place. One thing you need to do is to get the panels PUSHED out to contact the fuse tubes if possible. I used this high tech tool (a wood floor cleaning mop). You could use a broom handle pushing against a piece of wood, etc etc but this lets you clamp it to the fuse and hold the panels out against the tubes until the meth dries.

    Also, when we do completely seal it in, you will want to probably put some weight in the floor of the baggage areas to press it down onto the fuse tubes there before you meth it as well.

    P1050913.jpg

    P1050914.jpg

    Last edited by Daveembry; 09-13-2019 at 07:36 AM.
    Dave Embry
    "You only live once.....
    ..but if you do it right.....
    ....once is enough."..

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •