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Thread: Building the EX3 - Tips & Hints

  1. #91
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    Default Re: Building the EX3 - Tips & Hints

    MERRY CHRISMAS! Time for a little work between grandkids morning nap before Christmas lunch!

    ENGINE COWL.

    There is a full section in the FINISH MANUAL on installing the cowl but itís for the EX2 cowl and itís totally different. You can look there and read through it for theory but it wonít help much with the EX3. Especially note that the EX2 cowl had much more excess material that had to be trimmed, so it was done in 2 trims whereas the EX3 cowl is only a little over 1/4Ē in excess, so there is only 1 trim and you have to be sure itís right the first time.

    I have attached 3 pdf pages on the cowl where you can see hardware, etc. These arenít in the manual anywhere at this time, so be sure to download and print.

    These EX3 cowls come with all the nutplates already installed and ready to go. The cowl is almost ready to fit and only requires a very small amount of trimming, so be careful not to cut too much.

    You will probably need some help to install it. First place several wraps of tape around the edge of the boot cowl to protect the paint and a layer on the inside lip of the boot cowl as well where the cowl will fit over. It makes it easier to see later if you put a different color tape on the lip of the boot cowl so it's easy to see the edge later.

    Put a mark on the tape on the boot cowl where the center of the boot cowl is (the overlap point) then find the center of the cowl and place a mark there on the edge next to the boot cowl center mark. When installing, be sure and you match the 2 center marks together so the cowl is centered on the boot cowl.


    P1060486.jpg
    (Black line on masking tape is the center of boot cowl and the small, silver mark on the black bowl is the center of the cowl)

    Start by laying the top cowl piece up on top of the engine and then work the bottom piece up into position. I used some 5 lb weights on top of the cowl piece right where it meets the back, center baffle/rubber seal area to keep it down. It will overlap the boot cowl just a small amount. You will notice it's a very tight fit at that point where the baffle just above the oil cooler is and weights help hold the rubber over until it kindof forms to cowl and you get the bottom half on.


    P1060490.jpg
    (Weights on top of the cowl over the oil cooler area of the baffles)

    The bottom half will have to go as far forward as possible behind the prop spinner bulkhead so you can work the front baffles under it and then slide it back. Keep working it, it will be stiff but it will fit.

    With the top of the cowl centered on the boot cowl center mark, go to the front and be sure to get the cowl centered around the prop spinner bulkhead. You can look/measure the distance between the bulkhead and the edge of the cowl and also the screw that joins the 2 sections together and be sure they are about the same.


    P1060488.jpg
    (Left side of cowl looking from the front)


    P1060489.jpg
    (Right side of cowl looking from the front)

    Then go to the side and look at the distance between the cowl and the spinner bulkhead and be sure it's equal distance on the top and the bottom. Be sure it's pushed as far up towards the boot cowl as possible.


    P1060487.jpg

    When it all looks good, I then take a pencil and mark on the masking tape around the edge of the cowl where it overlaps the boot cowl. Then I pull the cowl back away from the boot cowl pretty much as far as I can until it touches the back of the prop spinner bulkhead and then look at that line you drew around the tape on the boot cowl and be sure there is at least 1/4" all the way around. This is just to be sure when we move the cowl forward and put the 1/4" fine line tape on it that we won't be cutting too much material off the cowl. The EX2 had alot of excess material and we made 2 cuts....the 1st to get it close and the 2nd to get it a perfect match. On the EX3's, the cowl is cut very close to being perfect so there is no room for error. We will only measure it and cut it once, so it has to be right this first time.

    With the cowl touching probably at the bottom side and being sure you still have the cowl centered on the top where it meets the boot cowl and at the front around the prop spinner hub, then we are going to take some 1/4" fine line tape and run it around the cowl keeping the aft edge of it perfectly touching the boot cowl edge. This will give us a place where we will cut the cowl on the forward side of this 1/4" fine line tape and it should give us a perfect fit up to the boot cowl.

    Before we do this, take some regular masking tape (like the thick, green tape) and run it up perfectly flush with the forward side of the tape where we will cut and then remove the 1/4" fine line tape. That is the area we will remove.

    I like using the Dremel tool cutoff wheel and just pull the cowl further back away from boot cowl as far as possible and then I slide a piece of aluminum between the cowl and engine/boot cowl before cutting.....or you can remove it and cut it. I take a few Popsicle sticks and put under the cowl to hold it out away from the boot cowl as well. If you are uncomfortable using your Dremel tool like this, you may just remove the cowl and cut it on the bench.


    P1060494.jpg

    Also will have to cut out the cowl at the bottom around the gasolator. Cut enough out so that you can get your fuel strainer cup up into the gasolator to pull fuel samples later.


    P1060492.jpg

    To get it to fit completely under the gasolator without bending it, you will have to cut it more, all the way down to get it to fit.

    After making the cut on the cowl, slide it back up so that it fits in the top, center where your center marks are on the boot cowl and cowl and put masking tape to hold it in place. Go around both sides pushing/pulling the cowl until it is up flush against the boot cowl and putting enough masking tape to hold it as you go. Mark any place that may need additional sanding or filing if any places are "humped" towards the boot cowl. After removing the cowl for paint, I will take some a long file or sanding block and go around the cut edge to smooth it. If you mess up and cut into the cowl, just fill it with some of your body filler and sand it down.

    After it's all tapes up, use cowl #2 figure attached here and make the measurements on the cowl. Start with making the hole on the side that connects the upper and lower half at the boot cowl. It should be .50" from the boot cowl side and .50" up from the cowl joint.


    P1060495.jpg

    From that mark, measure up 5.3" UP from that mark towards the center. You should get a perfectly equal 4 segments ending at the dead center at the top. If not, move the top one over enough to have it centered on both cowls (boot cowl and cowl). Do the same for both side. This will leave you will 9 places, including the 2 joint marks on either side.


    P1060497.jpg

    Next, measure 5.3" from that same joint mark and go DOWN on either side giving you 8 more places marked. Make it .50" edge distance from the boot cowl. This should then give us a total of 17 holes to drill with a #40 bit through the cowl and boot cowl flange.

    After removing the cowl, I'll drill the cowl only with a #30 bit and then countersink it enough to make the dimpled washers NAS1169C6L fit flush and then install the nutplates MS21059L06 with MS20426A3-4 rivets into the boot cowl. DONE!
    Attached Files Attached Files
    Last edited by Daveembry; 12-28-2018 at 05:29 AM.
    Dave Embry
    "You only live once.....
    ..but if you do it right.....
    ....once is enough."..

  2. #92
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    Default Re: Building the EX3 - Tips & Hints

    COWL

    So we have the cowl all cut and fit to the boot cowl.


    P1060498.jpg


    P1060499.jpg

    Since the 2 halves put together are thicker, you can sand the 2 halves of the cowl, where the 2 halves meet the boot cowl ....thin...so it doesn't stick up higher than the other 2 halves of the cowl.


    P1060500.jpg
    (Man, doesn't that pearl, metallic blue look good when a little light hits it!!!)


    To install the nutplates, first drill out the center holes we drilled that are in the boot cowl flange and the 2 in the cowl (only the bottom half of the cowl where the nut plates are going)..... using a #19 bit. Then using the nutplate tool, drill #40 holes for the nutplates and dimple these rivet holes.

    Install the rivets and also drill out the holes we drilled in the upper & lower cowl with a #30 bit and countersink the holes to make the washers flush.

    Now I'll remove the boot cowl and fit the oil door per the file I attached to this post. What I have found that works nicest, is to go ahead and fit the hinge on the door and drill the holes for the 1/4 turn fasteners now......but to make painting easier for the door itself, I will go ahead and squeeze the rivets from the hinge to the door itself now....but I won't attach the hinge to the cowl yet.

    OIL DOOR

    We need to install the hinge for the oil door on the cowl side. First, cut off the excess rod that goes through the 2 hinge pieces and use some sidecutters to pinch down on the end of the hinge tube to keep the pin from sliding.

    Fit the hinge into the opening with the side that does onto the cowl on the bottom of the cowl. You may have to trim a little of the sides of the cowl for the hinge or the hinge pins to fit good. Tape it in place where it operates good and then match drill and cleco holes from the bottom of the cowl. Countersink the holes on the top.


    P1060501.jpg

    Drill out the 2 holes in the corner of the oil door with a 5/8" bit and deburr. Tape it into place and see if it needs trimming anywhere to fit inside the opening. I make sure it fits nice and flat and flush on the bottom first and then see if the top or any corners need some sanding to make it sit nice and flat.


    P1060503.jpg


    P1060502.jpg

    Once it's good, tape it in place and match drill the 2 end holes from the hinge into the door. You can then remove the clecos and take the door off and finish drilling the holes. Countersink the top of the oil door perfectly.

    Cleco the hinge back onto the cowl and mark through the 5/8" holes you drilled. Then drill 3/8" holes on these marks in the cowl where the 1/4 turn studs will pass through from the oil door.


    P1060504.jpg

    Put the hinge only back in place on the cowl and cleco and then squeeze the 5 rivets from the cowl to the hinge being sure the countersink areas are perfect since you will see this ALOT!


    P1060505.jpg

    Take the clecos out and remove the door and put the other 5 rivets in place (DON'T SQUEEZE THEM! Just set in place) in the top of the hinge and tape in place so they can be painted. We are just using the hinge as a holder


    P1060506.jpg
    (NOTE: These rivets are NOT squeezed! They are simply in place so they can be painted)


    P1060507.jpg
    (The tape is placed over the rivets just to hold them there until I get ready to spray the paint.

    I actually paint the oil door separately so it isn't attached no, but to make it look the best, I will go ahead and stick the rivets that are used from the hinge to the cowl, into place before painting. I just put some tape on to hold them in place while moving and spraying the paint. Later, I'm just careful when bucking the .....now painted....rivets so I don't scratch them and it works great. The rivets are painted to match the cowl and don't stand out so much.

    Note that the last 2 kits have NOT had the parts needed for the oil door. See if you have 2 of each of the SK28S-2S Studs; SK2600-LWS Retaining Washer and SK213-2 Receptacle for the 1/4 turn screws and if not.......CALL MITCH and get them coming.
    Attached Files Attached Files
    Last edited by Daveembry; 12-27-2018 at 05:07 PM.
    Dave Embry
    "You only live once.....
    ..but if you do it right.....
    ....once is enough."..

  3. #93
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    Default Re: Building the EX3 - Tips & Hints

    FINISH MANUAL

    Moving on to the FINISH MANUAL I'll start doing everything I can before moving my fuselage to the hangar where I'll install the wings, windshield, skylight, turtle deck, elevators, etc. My hangar is not heated and is a 30 minute drive away, so I like to do everything I possibly can before moving there this time of year to save some kerosene that goes into my space heaters.

    The door handles go on with 2 of the SP23102-001 set screws on each handle. These have NOT been in the last few kits so you will probably need to check your kit and CALL MITCH and get these 4 screws coming. I put some BLUE loctite on the screws as I have had them want to come out later.


    P1060509.jpg

    I put the "split" EXPERIMENTAL sticker on the door hinge where you get in and then put the "ROCKGUARD" clear plastic material all around the inside of the door to protect the paint. You will notice I don't like painting the metal parts of the door and hinge as I think it looks better natural.


    P1060508.jpg


    Be sure you have connected the static lines to each side of the inside of the boot cowl with the clamp as shown in the G3X Manual. I use the solder sleeve heat gun to heat up the end of the tubing to make it softer to fit over the fitting. I can't get then on any other way.
    '
    Install the hose now or later when you get the middle, left interior panel in and connect the cable to the rear seat heat vent inside and under the instrument panel. The clamps are HDW-100-213 and the hose is the RM0006-001 2" SCAT.


    P1060510.jpg


    P1060528.jpg


    When you install the cable for the heat box, you need to secure the cable to the fuse tube somewhere to hold it in place. You will notice the arm on the heat box goes all the way to the down position so it's best to have the cable angle over to the box from the more aft position to give it a better angle pulling and pushing that arm up and down. If you bring the cable further forward on the fuse and then straight down towards the arm, then in the down position it may be hard to get it to come up.


    P1060512.jpg

    REAR BAGGAGE AREA CARPET

    I always purchase the extended baggage area carpet kit that CC sells. It's super lightweight and just Velcros into place on the back, floor and sides of the entire baggage area. You can just pull it out to clean. I'll install it now and then install the seat belts in place in the rear floor over the carpet.



    P1060515.jpg


    P1060514.jpg



    TORQUE PLATES FOR WHEELS

    Just a heads up that all the EX3 kits I've received had the wrong Torque Plates for the Grove brakes. The EX3 went to 6 hole plates (that mount onto gear leg) instead of the 4 hole that was on the EX2. They shipped SP45009-003, which is the 4 hole so check and see if they shipped that to you and if so, CALL MITCH and get the 6 hole coming. I'm almost ready to mount my wheels and brakes to load it on trailer and now have to wait for these.

    INSTALL EXTENDED BAGGAGE DOOR

    I pulled all the hardware back when I was fitting the door in place and had it in a plastic bag so I'll just get it out now and install the hinge and 1/4 turn fasteners per the drawings.

    I find the holes with a sharp awl, then use the soldering iron to burn the fabric/paint away from the holes. This is another good time (like doing the side door) where a little of that sticky fuel lube (EZ Turn) on your finger helps hold the washer to the nut and then both to your finger while you try to start the screw on the nut. Put a little dab of it on the washer and stick it to the nut and then some on your fingertip and stick the nut to it. If you can't get the washer to stay lined up after a few tries, you can also superglue the washer to the nut.


    P1060518.jpg


    Put the nut/washer on the very tip of your finger and with the screw and screwdriver in place, just try to slide it up under the screw to get it to catch in the holes of the nut/washer and then start turning the screwdriver while pushing the nut over straight. Go lefty and righty on the screwdriver until you can get it started.

    P1060519.jpg


    At this point I don't tighten the nuts up yet until after I've completely fitted the door with the 1/4 turn fasteners.

    Close the door up and see how it fits and then push your awl through the center of the holes in the door and into the fabric on the fuse where the 1/4 turn receptacles are. Same thing......burn them open with the soldering iron.


    P1060520.jpg

    In the hardware listed, there are 1/4 turn fasteners, plastic washers which go on the outside of the door under the head of the 1/4 turn fastener and a metal retaining clip. Notice that the head of the 1/4 turn fasteners have a number on them like 180, 200, 220, etc. This is the length of the fastener. Grab one and put the plastic washer on and slide through the hole in the door and into the receptacle on the fuse. DON'T install the metal retainer yet until you are sure of the fit.


    P1060521.jpg

    Turn the fastener and see if it goes in good and is snug. If it won't go all the way in when you turn it then you need a longer one. If your turn it the 1/4 turn and it went the last bit loose and is sloppy or not snug, then it's too long.....go to a shorter one. If you have it just right it seems like the 180 and 200's work fine. The reason it differs is the thickness of the carbon fiber on the door and door frame and also the amount of poly brush/spray/paint, etc you put on when you finished it.

    Once you find the ones that fit, go ahead and install the retaining clips with a good pair of needle nose pliers. Try and push 1 side of the split in the ring under the riser on the stud and then use the pliers to try and get the rest of the clip under that riser. It's kindof like installing those damn fairlead clips!


    P1060522.jpg

    If you close the baggage door and it doesn't easily go flush with the door frame all the way around, you may move the hinge around just a bit one way or the other if you have a little room in the holes where the screws went in (you can drill them out a little bigger if needed to let the screws move around some if needed). Once you have it good then tighten those little nuts.
    Last edited by Daveembry; 12-29-2018 at 09:16 PM.
    Dave Embry
    "You only live once.....
    ..but if you do it right.....
    ....once is enough."..

  4. #94
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    Default Re: Building the EX3 - Tips & Hints

    BRAKE LINES

    I don't cover my landing gear because it will just beat up if landing off airport enough. It might cost a couple mph but I like the looks without it being covered as well. I also install the VP0400-001 STAINLESS STEEL BRAKE LINES since the lines are exposed a little more. I also turn the fittings around on the brake calipers (on the 1.75" heavy duty brake option I always get as well) so that the line in goes on top instead of the bottom. More protection against rocks, etc.

    If you get the stainless steel brake lines you will have to change out the 90 degree elbow fitting that we installed on the brake cylinder on the pedals earlier and install the AN822-4D elbows (blue) that should come with the brake lines as well as the VP1101-001 Straight Fittings that connect onto the end of the brake line. Use the Loctite 567 Thread Sealer on all the fittings.


    P1060533.jpg
    (The BLUE fitting here will have to be installed in place of the standard fitting)

    Burn a hole on either side of the underside of the fuse per the photos on Page 127 of the FINISH MANUAL for the line to pass through. I just take the line and burn a small hole and try to pass the line through and keep opening it up a bit until it fits. Then I seal it with a little silicone.


    P1060523.jpg

    Run it over and up through the grommet into the cockpit. I use a Dremel with cut off wheel and cut the very end of the braided steel line off nice and clean before installing the fitting on it.

    Screw off the end of the fitting that goes over the steel line and put it over the line and back out of the way.


    P1060524.jpg

    Next separate the braided steel from the tubing at the end and fit the one piece between the braid and the tube. The outside of the line has a plastic coating over the steel braid, so I split that 1/4" back and then use a small, flat screwdriver to separate the braid from the line.


    P1060525.jpg

    Then put the other half of the fitting with the tube on the end, inside the fitting and tighten.

    For the last 2 kits, they have sent me the wrong stainless steel lines. The one they sent had too small of an inside diameter tubing so the fitting wouldn't go in. The fitting is .20" where it goes into the tube and the one they sent me was half that size ID. Took me forever last time trying to make it work before Mitch said it was wrong and sent the correct one, so check yours first. I'll have to wait now for the correct line.


    INTERIOR PANELS

    To start with I was missing all the Nylon rivets needed so CALL MITCH. You need about 60 of them. HDW-SR-5065B is the part number.

    Slide the middle, left panel in place. Be sure the velcro is on the post on the back side as well as at the top lip that goes over the window sill area. Put the 3M Adhesive Promoter on first. I like these small, individual packets on Amazon https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B0...?ie=UTF8&psc=1.

    P1060526.jpg


    After getting the fuel selector through the panel, install the hardware per the FINISH MANUAL and FN17 on Page 65. The figure is such bad resolution I can't really make it out. I think the 2 screws at the top are AN526C1032R8. I used these and they worked. The bottom 2 I guessed at AN507C632R8 and it works. The center screw in the turn knob I guessed at AN507C832R7 and there was 1 in the kit and it also worked.


    P1060527.jpg

    I was missing the placard that goes around the fuel selector valve. Here are some other placards I was missing as well so you might as check your kit and give MITCH A CALL if you are missing any. They are listed on the next to last page in the FINISH KIT packing list.

    Missing Placards:
    - ??? 2 Fuel Tank cover placards
    - ??? The one that goes around the fuel selector valve
    - CK10950-001 Amateur-Built Warning
    - SC10950-017/CC11 Extended Cargo
    - SC10950-007/CC11 Forward Cargo
    - SC73110-001 Magnetic sensor location
    - SK10957-001 Oil Door

    I line the panels up with my marks on the masking tape on the bottom and use an awl to help get the first couple panels perfectly in line with the drilled holes
    BUT BE CAREFUL.....THE FABRIC IS RIGHT THERE so don't go through to the fabric with your awl!

    Like I mentioned before, I use these curved pliers that are almost free at Harbor Freight.


    P1060529.jpg

    They work perfectly to hold the rivets base while you push them in completely, then while holding it there with the pliers, reach with your other hand and push it in all the way.


    P1060531.jpg


    Again, be sure the front side panels are going to the OUTSIDE of the fuse at the very front (behind the rudder pedals). They do NOT go to the inside of the cockpit but outside to hold them away.


    P1060532.jpg



    INSTALLING D WINDOWS

    My windows have always fitted perfectly with no trimming but you can go to the FINISH MANUAL, Page 44 to go over checking it out. If you want to paint the "D" design in the back windows, then you can download the template in Dropbox under the "CCK PICTURES/PAINT" folders for it and put it on poster board.

    CHUCK & RYAN'S post is again explained very well so I'll put it in here now. Note that it's a little different layout now in that the paint line will run right through the flap cone pocket but it's the same principle.

    Rear side windows


    A pattern was made scaling it to size from the pattern on the website on a piece of grid marked poster board. (I have previously commented on that stuff. It is really handy). The pattern was carefully cut out, since both the inner and outer portion will be used.

    The outer portion (which marks the area to be painted) was used to cut away the protective wrap about a half inch inside where the paint edge will be. This was done with a scissors. We avoided touching the plastic window with a knife or any sharp object whatsoever.



    The inner pattern was taped in place. The area that will be painted was buffed with a super fine Scotch Brite pad.



    The outer pattern was set on the window and used as a reference for applying the 3M blue 1/8Ē tape. The area was then carefully masked.



    The area to be painted was sprayed with Bull Dog adhesion promoter and permitted to set up for a few minutes per the instructions, then followed with the finish coat of PPG Polyurethane. The plastic was placed on a vertical board, suspended with a nail through the flap hole, to minimize dust settling on the surface. It came out well. What I don't know is how durable it will be.




    FLAP CONES

    FINISH MANUAL, Page 46. Use the figure to install the cones in place. The rest of the hardware will be installed on the long bolt when we install the flaps so just put some tape on it for now. Be sure the bearing is seated all the way into the flap cone and that you use the AN4-14 length bolt shown here. You will see later when we install the flaps why this one is the correct length.

    We already installed the seat belts and flap handle.

    WINDOW FRAMES

    FINISH MANUAL, Page 74. Install the window latches on each frame.

    NOTE: CHECK THE FRAMES TO BE SURE THEY ARE LABELED CORRECTLY. I JUST SPEND ALL THE TIME TO INSTALL THE HARDWARE AND WENT TO MOUNT THE FRAMES AND NOTICED THE FACTORY HAD THE LABELS WRONG ON BOTH.....BOTH.....OF THE FRAMES. The left frame was labeled as the right one and the right one labeled as the left one. YOU CAN TELL BY LOOKING AT THE HINGE AND BEING SURE THE HINGE IS TO THE OUTSIDE OF THE AIRPLANE WHEN INSTALLED.

    Note that the plastic washers NAS1515H06L calls for 4 each on the screw between the handle piece and the window frame. (NOT under the screw head) That is correct. This gives you room to adjust the distance later if you need to when fitting. Just pay attention to which side of the frame you are installing the handles. The nut goes inside the frame and you can get your 11/32" wrench in from the bottom to tighten it up snug. Here are photos of the LH frame.


    P1060536.jpg


    P1060537.jpg



    P1060534.jpg




    Last edited by Daveembry; 01-31-2019 at 07:28 AM.
    Dave Embry
    "You only live once.....
    ..but if you do it right.....
    ....once is enough."..

  5. #95
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    Default Re: Building the EX3 - Tips & Hints

    WINDOW FRAMES (cont)

    Continuing on FINISH MANUAL Page 74, the hinges are already installed. The handles are the only thing we install right now. Later we will install the window catch SC23211-001 after the wings are installed.

    Match drill with #40 and then #18 bits through the header panels.

    On the left, aft side of the window hinge, you will need to put the black ground wire that is in that header panel wiring harness, onto one of the screws and under the nut. I sand the paint off where that wire connector makes contact with the fuse hinge attach fitting. They say your really don't need to do that since the screw makes contact with the ground wire and the inside of the metal but I still like really good grounds.


    P1060541.jpg


    P1060542.jpg

    (In this photo you can see how the hinge should be....it should be on the outside of the frame/airplane. Be sure they have the window frame parts tags correct. As I said, mine were labeled wrong.....both of them!)

    I'm not sure why the manual says to only put the 2 screws into each hinge now but maybe just to check it out and be sure it's all square with the fuse. If not, you can shift one side down by using washers between the window frame hinge and the fuse header panel to move that side down. It doesn't have to be perfect because the bottom of the window there will be painted covering up the bottom of the window frame and the front will have a cover piece. You can go ahead and install all the screws/washer/nuts at this time.

    The catches are pre-bent now also by the factory where the window handles go down into. I found the ones on the right (That goes into the door) are the right distance if mounted with the bent part flush with the outside of the door but the left ones are bent too far out. You can install it a bit overhanging the outside of the window sill (its over the left, middle interior panel) and will probably have to also add some more of the plastic washers between the window latches and the frame to get the frame out further to being flush with the front and rear tubes on the fuse that the plexiglass windows will overlap.

    Also be sure that when you lower the window with the latches in the DOWN position (like they would normally be when locking the window in place) that it will hit the lip of the catch and prevent it from hitting the paint if you accidentally have one in the down position when you close it.


    P1060545.jpg

    (See here how I have overhung the pre-bent part of the plate a little more towards the outside but the front of the frame is not flush with the fuse where the arrows are)


    P1060546.jpg

    (I will add more of the plastic washers here to get the frame out further.)



    P1060543.jpg

    A bungee works good to hold the window up while you are working on it.


    BATTERY BOX

    We previously set up the battery box back when doing the fuse. I would not install it or the front seat and belly pan until after you have installed the ailerons and elevators and made final tension adjustments to their cables and final install of the autopilot servos if you have them.

    You can drill the holes for the battery cables now and install the grommets. The correct grommets are MS35489-11.


    REAR SEAT AND SEAT HOLDER

    I think pretty much self explanatory. The tops of the seat install like this over the top fuse bar. Note how the fuel lines go into the side of the header panel. You can see that this is easier to install BEFORE you install your "D" windows.


    P1060553.jpg


    HORIZONTAL STABILIZERS

    FINISH MANUAL. Page 91. Tubes part numbers listed are wrong. XC15009-001 is the front and XC15008-001 for the rear are the correct numbers . The rest is pretty self explanatory. I want to say that you need to be very careful drilling the holes into the stabilizers. The tubes are very hard so I use an electric drill when drilling through the hard metal instead of my battery powered drill. The problem came in when I was working on my last plane and I put alot of pressure down to get the bit to bite and the bit broke and when it broke, the drill went forward and of course through the finished and painted stabilizer!!! So, I got my first lesson on removing riveted fabric and got to recover and repaint that stabilizer! Now I think I'll just stick with my battery drill and take longer because the drill will bind down and stop before breaking the bit if it gets a little sideways!


    stabilizer tear.jpg

    The holes are pre-drilled now in the stabilizers so you just need to locate them and clean them out with the #30 drill. You can look inside the tube in the stabilizer and see the holes. The front (curved edge) holes are 1.25" from the outside of the tube. I take an awl to locate the hole, then drill, then after going to the final size holes of .191 or #11 bits are done (FN26 says to drill to .191 which is #11 but manual says #12 which is wrong but works), then use the soldering iron to clean the fabric/paint, etc away. The rear holes are .75" from the edge.

    Before installing the cross tubes into the first stabilizer on the bench, clean the tubes and test fit the cross tubes into the stabilizer tubes to be sure they go in OK.

    The front tube seems to fit OK once you have cleaned the paint out of the tubes but the rear one is pretty tight and took a few taps with a rubber mallet after cleaning and scraping it. Once thing to do is that after you have 1 side done with the cross tubes installed and bolted in, then before inserting it into the fuse, first be sure the cross tubes will fit OK into the other stabilizer on the bench so you aren't fighting it while at the airplane. Just sand, clean, etc the tubes until they go in OK on the bench and then insert it into the fuse and follow the manual to finishing up.


    MOUNTING TIRES ON RIMS

    I'm using the standard CC Grove wheels with the 1.75" Heavy Duty brakes with the 31" Alaskan Bushwheel tires. I'm sure you know but one of the best things about these tires is that the tube is essentially built in to the tire with the valve stem recessed flush with the side of the tire. The valve stem does not go through the wheel, so you should take some silicone caulk and seal up the hole in the wheel to keep dirt, etc out.

    The good thing about this is that you can still spin the tires on the rims without breaking off the valve stem which can happen on tires with the stem going through the wheel/rim and if the tire does spin on the rim, the tube is built in so it doesn't hurt anything (except your braking).

    Remove the valve stem core and let all the air out of the tires.

    The wheel bearings in the wheels must be re-packed with good grease like Aeroshell 22. Here is a good EAA video on how to do it if you haven't done it before http://www.eaavideo.org/detail/video...-and-repacking. After packing with the grease, leave one side of the wheel without the bearings until after you have installed the rim into the tire so you can look in and be sure you are not pinching the tire with the 2 halves of the wheels.

    Here is a link to the Grove website with their instructions for installing the tires and brakes. These are 6.00 x 6 rims I'm using. The instructions and the wheel themselves say to torque to 150 in lbs. The brake calipers will be torqued to 90 in lbs. http://groveaircraft.com/brakeinstall.html.


    P1060549.jpg

    At this link for the tires you can see on pages 9 & 10 the tire mounting instructions from Airframes Alaska who owns the Alaskan Bushwheel tire company. http://www.airframesalaska.com/v/vsp...%20ICA-AML.pdf

    I found the best way was to put the caliper half of the rim on the floor of the garage with some blocks of wood on the floor. I get that half of the rim set inside the tire and then get the 3 bolts started through to the outside of the rim. Be sure the tire is mounted with the valve stem to the outside. They recommend that the tires later get rotated not only side to side but on the rims as well.

    After starting the bolts I lay the tire down onto the 2 blocks on the floor so that the brake rotor is resting on it so it will keep the rim pushed up good. I then get my fat butt and stand on the other side of the rim until enough air goes out of the tire and my weight pushing that side of the rim down far enough to get at least 1 washer/nut started (so it's best to have a set in your hand to start with). Then put the rest of them on and torque to the 150 in lbs.

    Install the other side of the wheel bearings and air up until you get the tire edge/bead to get up against the rim. Usually about 10 psi will do it. Get a precise measurement of the air pressure and then check them in a day or 2 and see if they leaked any. I actually had a bad one on my last plane. If you look inside the tire about where the 2 halves of the wheels meet, you will see a tire patch. This is actually not a patch but just a cover they use over a valve that they use to inject the rubber that makes up the inside tire. After filling it they remove the valve and plug it but one of mine had a very small leak after a few days. I removed the tire and put some spit around that patch and it bubbled. Alaska Bushwheels were great......they overnighted a new tire and a call tag to pick up the bad one to return. Couldn't ask for better customer service.


    P1060551.jpg

    I'll just mount up the tires on the rims using a very small amount of talc powder to help rims slide into the center of the 31" tires. Don't use too much because you don't want the tires to slide/slip around on the rims when you get on the brakes when landing.

    LANDING GEAR INSTALLATION

    I attached 2 drawings that address installing the standard bungee gear you can refer to but to install the wheels to the gear you can see on the attachments the hardware. Here is a photo of one of the 2 figures showing that.


    P1060552.jpg



    NOW IT'S TIME TO TAKE THE FUSE TO THE HANGAR AND START HANGING THE WINGS, INSTALLING THE WINDSHIELD, FLAPS, AILERONS, ELEVATORS, SKYLIGHT, TURTLE DECK, ETC. SURE HOPE WE GET SOME WARM WEATHER THE NEXT FEW WEEKS SO i CAN BE FLYING!

    Also depending on how fast you are building and time of year, you will want to get Mitch to send you the DATA PLATE and your BILL OF SALE. The Bill of Sale will need to go into FAA to get your paperwork started because you'll need your Registration from them when you get your final inspection. The model year on the registration will be the date the FSDO or DAR signs your Airworthiness Cert.

    I recommend purchasing the EAA publications. Here is a link to the process https://www.eaa.org/eaa/aircraft-bui...built-aircraft and here is the link to their CERTIFICATION GUIDE. I used this for the first plane and it was great with a complete checklist of exactly what you need to do and in the correct order/timing along with all the FAA Forms needed. https://www.eaa.org/Shop/ProductCata...SubTopicID=945

    FYI. I HAVE 362 TOTAL HOURS IN THE BUILD TO THIS POINT.
    Attached Files Attached Files
    Last edited by Daveembry; 01-14-2019 at 12:59 PM.
    Dave Embry
    "You only live once.....
    ..but if you do it right.....
    ....once is enough."..

  6. #96
    Senior Member ceslaw's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2013
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    Carterville, IL
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    384

    Default Re: Building the EX3 - Tips & Hints

    I would add two post scripts to this:

    First, it is best to wait to paint the rear side windows until the end when the precise location of the door - window paint lines is known.

    Second, when I did this project some three years ago I questioned how durable it would be. I can say now that it has held up well. No failure of the paint whatsoever. I am convinced that Bull Dog is an important part of the process.

    By the way, very nice and detailed blog! ! !

    Chuck



    Rear side windows

    A pattern was made scaling it to size from the pattern on the website on a piece of grid marked poster board. (I have previously commented on that stuff. It is really handy). The pattern was carefully cut out, since both the inner and outer portion will be used.

    [deleted material]

    The area to be painted was sprayed with Bull Dog adhesion promoter and permitted to set up for a few minutes per the instructions, then followed with the finish coat of PPG Polyurethane. The plastic was placed on a vertical board, suspended with a nail through the flap hole, to minimize dust settling on the surface. It came out well. What I don't know is how durable it will be.





  7. #97
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2015
    Location
    Broken Arrow, OK
    Posts
    535

    Default Re: Building the EX3 - Tips & Hints

    Thanks Chuck. Good point about the paint line. There is a windshield liner, which goes around the base of the windshield later. It wraps around to the side and should be installed so that the bottom of the windshield liner aligns with the bottom of the side windows. The D window, if being painted.....would be painted first according to the pattern. Then the front window is fitted (the new windows do not require any fitting at all for all 3 planes I've had) and then the paint line along the bottom is aligned so that the top of that paint line matches the top of the D window paint line (just over 2" or so). The front of the side window going from the bottom to the top is just wide enough to cover the metal framework that the window is attached to. I've noticed that the planes not painting the rear D windows that they also don't paint that bottom to top strip on the front of the side window. By not painting the rear D window, all the framework is exposed so it's just personal preference. I like to cover it up myself.

    The BullDog is good stuff. On the last plane I had the fuel selector leak right from the factory and didnít notice it for 2 weeks. It was a very small leak with maybe a drop every few hours but left a blue stain that came through the fabric at the side stringer and I wanted to touch up the paint. One of the CC dealers said they had tried to paint touchup one that had the same issue before and they did it twice and both times, the paint wouldnít stick where the fuel had soaked through the fabric/poly brush/spray/paint.......and peeled off and they had to finally do a fabric patch. Talking to the factory, they said that after sanding to just put some bulldog on that area before painting and it would stick. I did that and it worked great. Blended the DUHS PPG paint right in and you canít see the touch up area at all. Just FYI to those who might have that situation arise.

    Quote Originally Posted by ceslaw View Post
    I would add two post scripts to this:

    First, it is best to wait to paint the rear side windows until the end when the precise location of the door - window paint lines is known.

    Second, when I did this project some three years ago I questioned how durable it would be. I can say now that it has held up well. No failure of the paint whatsoever. I am convinced that Bull Dog is an important part of the process.

    By the way, very nice and detailed blog! ! !

    Chuck



    Rear side windows

    A pattern was made scaling it to size from the pattern on the website on a piece of grid marked poster board. (I have previously commented on that stuff. It is really handy). The pattern was carefully cut out, since both the inner and outer portion will be used.

    [deleted material]

    The area to be painted was sprayed with Bull Dog adhesion promoter and permitted to set up for a few minutes per the instructions, then followed with the finish coat of PPG Polyurethane. The plastic was placed on a vertical board, suspended with a nail through the flap hole, to minimize dust settling on the surface. It came out well. What I don't know is how durable it will be.




    Last edited by Daveembry; 01-14-2019 at 08:46 AM.
    Dave Embry
    "You only live once.....
    ..but if you do it right.....
    ....once is enough."..

  8. #98
    Senior Member ceslaw's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2013
    Location
    Carterville, IL
    Posts
    384

    Default Re: Building the EX3 - Tips & Hints

    Well, Dave, you just made my day.

    I had the exact same issue with a leak from the fuel selector causing a bit of discoloration in the paint, and it would not hold the touch up paint. Never occurred to me to use the Bull Dog on it. I will do so, and fix that small but annoying issue. Good tip.

    I believe I posted on that leaky valve issue, long ago. Turned out the O rings were fractionally too small, compared to the replacements. I always suspected there would be a rash of builders with leaky valves.

    Chuck

  9. #99
    Senior Member ATXCubDriver's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2014
    Location
    Austin, TX
    Posts
    343

    Default Re: Building the EX3 - Tips & Hints

    Or just leave em square!!

    IMG_5251.jpg


    Quote Originally Posted by ceslaw View Post
    I would add two post scripts to this:

    First, it is best to wait to paint the rear side windows until the end when the precise location of the door - window paint lines is known.

    Second, when I did this project some three years ago I questioned how durable it would be. I can say now that it has held up well. No failure of the paint whatsoever. I am convinced that Bull Dog is an important part of the process.

    By the way, very nice and detailed blog! ! !

    Chuck



    Rear side windows

    A pattern was made scaling it to size from the pattern on the website on a piece of grid marked poster board. (I have previously commented on that stuff. It is really handy). The pattern was carefully cut out, since both the inner and outer portion will be used.

    [deleted material]

    The area to be painted was sprayed with Bull Dog adhesion promoter and permitted to set up for a few minutes per the instructions, then followed with the finish coat of PPG Polyurethane. The plastic was placed on a vertical board, suspended with a nail through the flap hole, to minimize dust settling on the surface. It came out well. What I don't know is how durable it will be.




    Mike Sasser
    Boomerang Air
    mike@boomerangair.net

    OK,AR,TX,LA
    www.cubcrafters.com




  10. #100
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2015
    Location
    Broken Arrow, OK
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    535

    Default Re: Building the EX3 - Tips & Hints

    Yep.....it seems more and more people are leaving them square since going away from the traditional cub paint schemes (like ALL firecracker red huh!). 😉

    Quote Originally Posted by ATXCubDriver View Post
    Or just leave em square!!

    IMG_5251.jpg
    Dave Embry
    "You only live once.....
    ..but if you do it right.....
    ....once is enough."..

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