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Thread: Beringer Alaskan Landing Gear System

  1. #41
    Senior Member turbopilot's Avatar
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    Default Re: Beringer Alaskan Landing Gear System

    Quote Originally Posted by 40m View Post
    As others systems are fully tested, tweaked and proven I'm sure there will be more participation but for now you could post on the Super Cub Forum as well. That will open it up.
    Bigger issue is that there are no STC's yet so the interest is restricted to the experimental market. Very active group on the "Big Tire Pilots" group on FaceBook.

    https://www.facebook.com/groups/136557813204682/
    Bob Anderson, CC11-00316, N382RA

  2. #42
    Senior Member Springloaded's Avatar
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    Default Re: Beringer Alaskan Landing Gear System

    This is probably one of the rougher pastures Acme gen 2 did a good. Iím landing next to a rifle range its old grove Iím a landing against the rows you have to land between them. Think grandma was happy to have her Granddaughter back😂
    Chuck Kinberger
    Southern Cubs
    Florida Cubcrafter Sales
    Jupiter Fl.
    Pa11890ck@gmail.com
    You can sit at home & hear the News or get out there & be the News

  3. #43
    Senior Member John Hodges's Avatar
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    Default Re: Beringer Alaskan Landing Gear System

    Point being that as good as the second generation Acmes are, the third generation is even better -- just as Beringer is taking something already very good and improving it. So after years of accepting primitive technology for landing gear, we're finally seeing innovation that markedly improves our experience with our airplanes.

    These things are game changers. STCs will follow.

  4. #44
    Senior Member Springloaded's Avatar
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    Default Re: Beringer Alaskan Landing Gear System

    [QUOTE=John Hodges;20815]Point being that as good as the second generation Acmes are, the third generation is even better --


    Absolutely the new Gen3 is way better I just donít have a set yet. The AOSS would of beat us up pretty bad.
    Chuck Kinberger
    Southern Cubs
    Florida Cubcrafter Sales
    Jupiter Fl.
    Pa11890ck@gmail.com
    You can sit at home & hear the News or get out there & be the News

  5. #45
    Senior Member ATXCubDriver's Avatar
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    Default Re: Beringer Alaskan Landing Gear System

    Not only improving our experiences we are increasing the safety margins considerably with this new technology.



    Quote Originally Posted by John Hodges View Post
    Point being that as good as the second generation Acmes are, the third generation is even better -- just as Beringer is taking something already very good and improving it. So after years of accepting primitive technology for landing gear, we're finally seeing innovation that markedly improves our experience with our airplanes.

    These things are game changers. STCs will follow.
    Mike Sasser
    Boomerang Air
    mike@boomerangair.net

    OK,AR,TX,LA
    www.cubcrafters.com




  6. #46
    Senior Member turbopilot's Avatar
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    Default Re: Beringer Alaskan Landing Gear System

    Continuing to explore the unusual characteristics of the Beringer ALG now with the Anti Roll System.

    Obviously the Carbon Cub is very light. With me and full fuel around 1250 lbs gross weight. This combination of a light airplane, 180 horsepower and high pressure gear struts creates a delightful situation for spectacular takeoffs.


    When I give the Carbon Cub full aft stick and full power at takeoff I notice the nose pitches up immediately around 5 degrees with the gear still rolling on the ground. This happens almost immediately around 5 mph. The result is blazing fast take off owing to the very high wing angle of attack. Feels to me like the struts once unloaded of just a little weight push the nose up while still rolling on the tail wheel, thus allowing the high wing angle of attack. In essence, with the Beringer ALG struts on the Carbon Cub, it seems to be simulating the same characteristic as you might expect in a Carbon Cub with the extended gear option.

    This new gear is really a lot of fun.
    Last edited by turbopilot; 02-20-2018 at 10:57 AM.
    Bob Anderson, CC11-00316, N382RA

  7. #47
    Senior Member turbopilot's Avatar
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    Default Re: Beringer Alaskan Landing Gear System

    More test flights trying to understand the dynamics on takeoff with the Beringer struts. I have my struts pumped up to 250 psi with Nitrogen. This is higher than recommended for my light weight. Wheels are still a little toed out with aircraft static on the ground. So I may add more pressure. More pressure will harden the ride as well.

    As described in the previous post I am still trying to understand the dynamics of takeoff with these struts. Originally I thought the aircraft was assuming a higher deck angle during a full power takeoff owing to air flow over the wings unloading the struts. After a few flights today I think there is a different dynamic. On the ground in idle the nose in my CC is pitched up to +11 degrees sitting on the tail wheel. As soon as I apply full power the struts immediately begin to extend before any significant speed is built up, pitching the nose up. I am seeing pitch ups of around 4 or 5 degrees up to 15 to 16 degrees nose up. The airplane is so slow at that point the trust from the engine pitched up to 15 degrees must be unloading the struts, allowing them to literally push the nose to a higher deck angle.

    The result is (if I keep full aft stick) that the main wheels lift off while the tail wheel continues to roll on the pavement. It does not take long before the airplane is flying right on the edge off stall with pretty mushy aileron control.

    So it appears to me that the high thrust of the CC340 engine at 15 degrees nose up is unloading the struts allowing the struts to push the nose to a very high of attack.

    I have not flow a CC with extended gear but it appears the CC with the Beringer ALS gets to about the same place in terms of takeoff performance by leveraging the energy contained in the strut charge to increase angle of attack.

    I will try to get some videos of these maneuvers.
    Last edited by turbopilot; 02-22-2018 at 06:12 AM.
    Bob Anderson, CC11-00316, N382RA

  8. #48
    Senior Member Dan L's Avatar
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    Default Re: Beringer Alaskan Landing Gear System

    Quote Originally Posted by turbopilot View Post
    More test flights trying to understand the dynamics on takeoff with the Beringer struts. I have my struts pumped up to 250 psi with Nitrogen. This is higher than recommended for my light weight. Wheels are still a little toed out with aircraft static on the ground. So I may add more pressure. More pressure will harden the ride as well.

    As described in the previous post I am still trying to understand the dynamics of takeoff with these struts. Originally I thought the aircraft was assuming a higher deck angle during a full power takeoff owing to air flow over the wings unloading the struts. After a few flights today I think there is a different dynamic. On the ground in idle the nose in my CC is pitched up to +11 degrees sitting on the tale wheel. As soon as I apply full power the struts immediately begin to extend before any significant speed is built up, pitching the nose up. I am seeing pitch ups of around 4 or 5 degrees up to 15 to 16 degrees nose up. The airplane is so slow at that point the trust from the engine pitched up to 15 degrees must be unloading the struts, allowing them to literally push the airplane into the air.

    The result is (if I keep full aft stick) that the main wheels lift off while the tail wheel continues to roll on the pavement. It does not take long before the airplane is flying right on the edge off stall with pretty mushy aileron control.

    So it appears to me that the high thrust of the CC340 engine at 15 degrees nose up is unloading the struts allowing the struts to push the nose to a very high of attack.

    I have not flow a CC with extended gear but it appears the CC with the Beringer ALS gets to about the same place in terms of takeoff performance by leveraging the energy contained in the strut charge to increase angle of attack.

    I will try to get some videos of these maneuvers.
    interesting observations Bob. Are you measuring your AOA on the bottom of the wing? Iíll check with 3Ē extended gear.

    Im on skis now and in the deep powder AOA is important.

    B849DCB8-FDCB-4D57-998C-EF587D2D8E82.jpg
    Flying Carbon Cub EX #11 since 2011

  9. #49
    Senior Member turbopilot's Avatar
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    Default Re: Beringer Alaskan Landing Gear System

    Quote Originally Posted by Dan L View Post
    interesting observations Bob. Are you measuring your AOA on the bottom of the wing? Iíll check with 3Ē extended gear.
    No, just watching the horizon on the Dynon SkyView.

    Taxi, takeoff and landing the Beringer gear is a totally different experience than stock gear. Some of this probably relates to the combination of a light weight aircraft (Carbon Cub) and high pressure struts. My understanding is that Beringer will be certifying the very same system gear system for much heavier Part 23 airplanes sometime in the future.

    This system on a Carbon Cub really compliments the other capabilities of this great little ELSA.
    Bob Anderson, CC11-00316, N382RA

  10. #50
    Senior Member David H's Avatar
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    Default Re: Beringer Alaskan Landing Gear System

    Great stuff Bob, very interesting.

    What equipment do you use to pressurize your struts? How do you measure the pressure? How do you add nitrogen? Where does your nitrogen come from? Do you have pictures of your fill set up?

    I will be using Acme Aero and may wish to adjust them.

    David

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