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Thread: Applying Poly-Tone on Metal Parts

  1. #1
    Senior Member Paul's Avatar
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    Default Applying Poly-Tone on Metal Parts

    There's as many methods out there for good paint jobs as there are builders. I don't suggest my method is better but thought I'd offer up some detail in our forum for others to consider. Mitch has helped me through this process and I'm very happy with results. Time will tell of course, how good a job it is but early signs point to this being a coat that will last. Here's the process I followed:

    Applying Poly Tone to Metal/Aluminum parts


    1) Clean the part very well using MEK or denatured alcohol (only use the MEK if the metal is really dirty or greasy). If you donít clean before scuffing, youíre actually forcing some of the impurities into the surface of the metal.
    2) Right after cleaning, scuff entire surface including edges using an Ultrafine Scotch-Brite pad. Donít overdo it. In fact use a worn pad, it will get the job done just fine. You do not want to be able to feel the scuffing but it should be visible.
    3) Wipe with a clean dry cotton rag. Now I clean it once more with an aerosol product that I found at a local automotive paint shop. HighTeck has a product called Wipeout Surface Prep 7800. You spray this on and immediately wipe off with a clean rag. It evaporates quickly but if you hit it right away it leaves the surface very clean. (MEK tends to leave a residue that can impact adhesion).
    4) For priiming I went with one of the primers that the boys in the plant are using. Sherwin Williams GBP 988 Self Etching Primer. (grey). It's possibly that this self etching primer is good enough to skip the scuffing but I wanted to give it a good chance to adheare.
    5) Once the primer is fully dry I scuffed again. This removed any dust specs and helped again with some tooth adhesion. Clean the surface again with a new clean rag. Wipe it until thereís no grey residue on your rag. If some spots come bare while scuffing I touched up with more 988.
    6) Now itís time for BullDog Adhesion Promoter. Follow the instructions and youíll be fine, but basically I was spraying on a wet coat and waiting 3 or 4 minutes. Then a second coat and waiting 5 to 7 minutes before I applied my primer.
    7) Now I move on to my finish coats. I went with 2 coats of Poly-Tone #105 Insignia White. You could probably get away with one heavy but I prefer a light first coat then hit it again 20 minutes later. Poly Fiber recommends this white base coat under yellow and I agree that the white necessary and will produce a brighter finish. It covers the Poly-Spray silver very well. Youíll use a lot more Yellow if you try to cover the silver directly and could get some discoloration if the coverage is not consistent.
    8) After consulting with Poly Fiber I decided to go straight to Cub yellow on the same day. It doesnít hurt to wait at least 2 hours but Hualdo at Poly Fiber said it was fine to go right ahead with yellow after the white reaches tack. The book recommends 2 hours but any time after tacky stage is fine. Clean your gun between white and yellow coats.
    9) Before you start your final coats (white base and yellow final) you should have all your paint and reducer out and ready and final paint shaken ready for reducing.
    10) Remember to chill your paint (yes, in your fridge next to the milk) overnight before using. If you take it out of your hot trunk or garage the paint will set up too quick and youíll minimize the small amount of gloss you can get out of Poly Tone.
    11) Control the temps in your paint booth or only paint on days when the temp is between 60 and 75.
    12) Check every finish coat (including white base coat) for dust or impurities in the finish and give it a light scuff if necessary. Scuff with used 320 Grit
    13) For your last, final coat, turn your nozzle so the fan is horizontal. Then apply the paint by ďpushingĒ this coat (moving forward) and moving your gun vertically on the piece, at a slight angle, shooting the paint forward. This minimizes the amount of overspray on the area youíre leaving behind and youíll see the gloss appear immediately behind your work. I used this technique only on the final pass of the final color. It gave me just the amount of gloss that I was looking for.
    14) If youíre looking for the classic Cub look, Poly Tone #143 Cub Yellow is the way to go! Just be sure thatís the tone youíre looking for as itís a very orange yellow.


    Applying Poly Tone to Carbon Fiber and other Composite parts

    I followed the same procedure as described above for applying Poly Tone on Aluminum with one exception.

    Point #2) use 320 or 400 grit sandpaper to scuff the surface rather than Scotchbrite pads. Donít overdo it as youíre taking some of the surface off so you just want to have a light dusting coming off as youíre sanding the surface. Then proceed and clean it thoroughly and follow all other steps described above. Note Ė in some cases I just used clean water or Windex and rags to clean these parts right after scuffing rather than the Wipeout Surface Prep.

    Hope this can be a help.
    Paul
    Last edited by Paul; 06-14-2014 at 08:44 AM.

  2. #2
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    Default Re: Applying Poly-Tone on Metal Parts

    Paul. How much of each product that you cited (quarts/gallons) did you buy to paint your EX?

    Thanks!

  3. #3
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    Default Re: Applying Poly-Tone on Metal Parts

    Paul.
    Just done painting with the same method and even colour combo...
    99% finished, 98% to go..

  4. #4
    Senior Member Paul's Avatar
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    Default Re: Applying Poly-Tone on Metal Parts

    Quote Originally Posted by terry View Post
    Paul.
    Just done painting with the same method and even colour combo...
    99% finished, 98% to go..
    Good work Terry. One other tip, that I learned the hard way. Be sure and let all your small parts like inspection covers "gas-off" adequately. I made the mistake of packing them for protection and stuck them away in a rubbermaid container and I had some parts lose their paint. The rest of my painted metal is looking really good. I'll be interested to see how it performs in the air considering all the comments Poly Fiber makes about poly-tone on metal.

  5. #5
    Senior Member Paul's Avatar
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    Default Re: Applying Poly-Tone on Metal Parts

    Quote Originally Posted by Chip View Post
    Paul. How much of each product that you cited (quarts/gallons) did you buy to paint your EX?]

    Thanks!
    Chip, here's a picture of my product. Thought it was worthy of my build album
    So working from the left to right....

    5 gallons Reducer
    7 1/4 gallons of Poly-Brush
    4 gallons of Poly Spray
    3 gallons of Poly Tone Insignia White (#140)
    3 gallons of Poly Tone Cub Yellow (#143)
    9 rattle cans of primer
    1 1/2 cans of Bulldog adhesion promoter
    and various cleaning products.

    Polyfiber product.jpg

    Obviously I used slightly more than what the kit included but if you consider that most of this product contains only about 15 to 20% solids, the total weight of all this product after the solvents are gone, is around 35 lbs.
    Last edited by Paul; 06-15-2014 at 08:06 AM.

  6. #6
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    Default Re: Applying Poly-Tone on Metal Parts

    Thank You!

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