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Thread: BRS and Carbon Cub

  1. #21
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    Default Re: BRS and Carbon Cub

    January 12, 2016


    CUBCRAFTERS INTRODUCES EMERGENCY AIRCRAFT PARACHUTES


    New Systems from BRS Aerospace Available
    for Company’s LSA, Kit, and Builder Assist Aircraft





    Quote Originally Posted by Charles View Post
    I flew Cirrus for many years and was always happy to have the chute on board. Not many have accused Cirrus of being safe - it is a high performance aircraft and flown on missions that can get it into trouble lots of ways. Our cubs are a different matter - for example it is pretty unlikely a cub will lose control at high altitude in IMC and a load of ice (we just don't fly in those conditions). But keep in mind that the motivation of the Klapmeier brothers for the Cirrus chute was a mid-air collision, and that is just as likely in a cub as a Cirrus. So I can see the utility of a BRS option for the Carbon Cub and would consider it if it was available.
    That was my post from 2014. This thread started in 2012. Now in 2016 CubCrafters is offering the BRS parachute as an option for new aircraft and as a retrofit option for the fleet.

    A few things have changed since that post. Cirrus has now evolved to a low fatality record, over twice as safe as the GA average. Much of this is due to more use of the BRS option. Another very good thing, a friend of mine is alive today after he pulled his Cirrus chute last month. Certainly BRS is not for all CubCrafters pilots, no one would argue that. But I said back then I would consider a BRS option. I'm in, and I'll dedicate it to my living friend.
    Chuck Hull
    L70 Agua Dulce, CA

  2. #22
    Member marcusadolfsson's Avatar
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    Default Re: BRS and Carbon Cub

    Thanks for finding this news! I wonder what the minimum deployment altitude is?

    Whenever I depart my home airport to the west, I generally have to cross the city with minimal areas to land. BRS is a great option when the engine stops and the terrain is hostile.

    http://www.cubcrafters.com/news/99-c...aft-parachutes

    Yakima, Washington – Light aircraft manufacturer CubCrafters is announcing new emergency parachute systems for the company’s line of backcountry tailwheel airplanes. The systems, developed in conjunction with BRS Aerospace, will further advance safety in CubCrafters’ already exceptional aircraft designs by allowing pilots a safe alternative in otherwise difficult emergencies.
    “The Carbon Cub is already recognized as the safest backcountry aircraft available,” comments Randy Lervold, President of CubCrafters. “Its extraordinarily slow stall speed, fundamentally sound wing shape and vortex generators assure low-speed stability and maneuverability. The Carbon Cub’s super-strong protective cage around its occupants is best in class. Now, the addition of the BRS systems not only provides a proven life-saving technology, but also additional piece of mind for Carbon Cub pilots and passengers.”
    The BRS parachute systems are offered on CubCrafters’ production Carbon Cub SS aircraft, as well as the company’s Carbon Cub FX Builder Assist model and their EX-2 kit. Systems are also available for retrofit on CubCrafters’ existing fleet of LSA and experimental aircraft. Three new BRS models are immediately available for these CubCrafters airplanes:
    • New production LSA aircraft, including the Carbon Cub SS, for gross weight up to 1,320 lbs. (1,430 lbs. on floats). For this configuration, the BRS system weighs 34.3 lbs. and is priced at $13,990 installed.
    • Retrofit on the existing fleet of LSA Carbon Cub and Sport Cub models, for gross weight up to 1,320 lbs. (1,430 lbs. on floats). This version weighs 41.4 lbs. and is priced at $15,990 installed.
    • Carbon Cub EX-2 and FX experimental aircraft for gross weight up to 1,865 lbs. This configuration weighs 43.5 lbs. and is priced at $11,990 as a kit, or $15,990 installed.
    The new BRS systems require annual inspection, a parachute repack every 6 years, and a rocket refresh every 12 years. These services, as well as installation of retrofit systems on fleet aircraft, can be performed now at CubCrafters’ Yakima, Washington facility and at select CubCrafters Authorized Service Centers in the near future.
    The new BRS system is the latest illustration of CubCrafters’ ongoing dedication to producing the safest aircraft possible. "As a light aircraft manufacturer, we feel it is incumbent on CubCrafters to offer proven mechanisms that contribute to product safety,” says Lervold. “The new BRS system is just another example of that commitment. It takes our already robust, reliable airplane design and makes it even safer.” Boris Popov, Founder and SVP at BRS adds, “Being in our 34th year of business, we have been, and continue to be involved with a wide spectrum of innovative aircraft designs. There is no doubt that the Carbon Cub design, as successful as it is, will be even more so with the inclusion of the safety-enhancing BRS recovery parachute system”
    The first CubCrafters BRS system has already been installed and delivered on a new Carbon Cub SS.
    N80DB #119 E-LSA / G3X Touch

  3. #23
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    Default Re: BRS and Carbon Cub

    Quote Originally Posted by marcusadolfsson View Post
    Thanks for finding this news! I wonder what the minimum deployment altitude is?

    Whenever I depart my home airport to the west, I generally have to cross the city with minimal areas to land. BRS is a great option when the engine stops and the terrain is hostile.

    http://www.cubcrafters.com/news/99-c...aft-parachutes
    Good question. There have been successful Cirrus saves under 500 feet, and BRS discusses a general 260 - 290 feet on their web site. But I doubt there have been specific tests for CubCrafters aircraft. The Carbon Cub gets to altitude very quickly, so there would be very little time to a deployable altitude.
    Chuck Hull
    L70 Agua Dulce, CA

  4. #24
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    Default Re: BRS and Carbon Cub

    Quote Originally Posted by marcusadolfsson View Post

    Whenever I depart my home airport to the west, I generally have to cross the city with minimal areas to land. BRS is a great option when the engine stops and the terrain is hostile.
    I would still rather have the choice of picking a place to put it down then be at the mercy of the wind and end up in a power sub station, water or hit " half " of a 100' high building roof and fall off the side. Or worse.
    Your a pilot as long as you have control, even limited control. Your a passenger once you pull the handle.

    Glenn
    Last edited by Cubdriver2; 01-21-2016 at 07:22 AM.

  5. #25
    Senior Member randylervold's Avatar
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    Default Re: BRS and Carbon Cub

    As evidenced by the comments in this thread there are strong opinions both for and against BRS, and that's why we are making it an option -- to allow each owner to craft the safety package they are most comfortable with.

    Regarding minimum deployment altitude, I believe our POH supplement will indicate that there is none. Even if one is nearly on the ground deploying the chute may help dissipate some forward motion/energy. Crash safety is about dissipating energy, and in our aircraft application we need to think about both downward and forward vectors.

    I'm no engineer or crash expert, but in addition to our fairly robust fuselage cage I think perhaps the biggest safety factor we have going for us is our low stall speed. At near stall speeds you are dissipating significantly less energy at impact relative to a faster airplane.

    Be safe out there!
    Randy Lervold

  6. #26
    Senior Member John Whitish's Avatar
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    Default Re: BRS and Carbon Cub

    Thanks for finding this news! I wonder what the minimum deployment altitude is?
    Regarding minimum deployment altitude, I believe our POH supplement will indicate that there is none. Even if one is nearly on the ground deploying the chute may help dissipate some forward motion/energy. Crash safety is about dissipating energy, and in our aircraft application we need to think about both downward and forward vectors.
    Randy is right. There is no minimum recommended deployment altitude. Since the system uses ballistic activation, the canopy inflates very quickly.

    From our upcoming FAQ:
    What is the minimum altitude that you can deploy the parachute?
    The distance required to deploy a parachute depends directly on airspeed. Recorded altitude activations of 100 ft. or less have saved lives. As a safe practice, no altitude limitation should be contemplated to allow activation. Just pull.

  7. #27
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    Default Re: BRS and Carbon Cub

    I wish that BRS was an option for XCub. While I know that some prefer not to equip their aircraft with ballistic parachutes, and that's fine, I would like the option. Guess I'll have to build an FX3 or EX3 to get BRS in there someday!

  8. #28
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    Default Re: BRS and Carbon Cub

    Quote Originally Posted by dane View Post
    I wish that BRS was an option for XCub. While I know that some prefer not to equip their aircraft with ballistic parachutes, and that's fine, I would like the option. Guess I'll have to build an FX3 or EX3 to get BRS in there someday!

    I wish it was an X option as well

  9. #29
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    Default Re: BRS and Carbon Cub

    Quote Originally Posted by eagle View Post
    I wish it was an X option as well
    I wonder what BRS does to weight and balance. For the EX/FX series where it is an option to add, what are the W&B implications? Where's it placed?

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